first_imgIn just 8 days, Phish will make their triumphant return to Madison Square Garden in New York City for their traditional 4-night New Year’s Run at the world’s most famous arena. Over the years, The Garden has become the de facto home court for the Phish from Vermont. To date, the band has played the storied midtown room 52 times–usually surrounding New Year’s Eve–and among those 52 are some of the more exciting and memorable shows they’ve ever played. As per tradition, the band will live stream all four nights of the upcoming run.Our Official Guide To Phish New Year’s Pre- And Post-PartiesIf you’re unable to make the shows at MSG, there will be live webcasts running for all four nights of Phish’s New Year’s run. The concerts will be streamed in both SD and HD formats, with pre-order available here via LivePhish.com. If you’re missing the run completely, there are discounted rates for bundle packages.With so much going on surrounding the Garden during this special time, we put together a rundown of some of the best pre- and post-parties around town. Check out the full guide here, and see you soon!last_img read more

first_imgWednesday evening, the Saint Mary’s Moreau Art Galleries welcomed two new spring exhibits, “Touristic Intents” by Mat Rappaport and “Homeland: Chicago & Belgrade Diasporas,” a collaborative project by Melissa Potter and Mat Rappaport. The exhibits will run from Wednesday through March 6. Monica Villagomez Mendez Artists Melissa Potter, left, and Mat Rappaport presented two next exhibits to the Saint Mary’s community in the Moreau Galleries, titled “Touristic Intents” and “Homeland: Chicago & Belgrade Diasporas.”“Touristic Intents” was created using photographs, single channel video, silk screened cardboard boxes, rubber, surveyor’s poles and audio. The exhibit explores a three mile-long building that was constructed in the 1930s to be a Nazi resort that was unfinished in Prora, Germany. Rappaport said he started his research for this project in 2008.Rappaport said the purpose of the site was to house 20,000 vacationing working class Germans after the destruction of the trade unions.“What struck me was that this building was designed by the Nazis started being built in 1936, and the architect of this building’s main objectives was to create a resort for the working class, for the German workers, where everyone had a sea side view,” Rappaport said.The exhibit consists of 135 images, with each image showing the views from windows that were taken within one block of one building section.According to a description of “Touristic Intents” as provided by a brochure at the event, each image “depicts only the space of a window’s opening, its ‘view’ floating on a white background.” In order to “reinforce the initial promise of an ocean view for all, the obscured view is mirrored on the page with a reconstruction of an ocean view pushing through the same shape.”The site was sold and intended to be converted into condominiums, rental apartments and hotels by private developers in the 1990s after it was used as secret military site during the German Democratic Republic. During that time, it was used as a German military training school, barracks and officers’ resort.Rappaport said the building he explored is one of the five that the Nazis had planned to build as a part of their “strength through joy” program.”I was fascinated by this idea that this fascistic government wants to do something that seems, at least in my mind, very, very progressive by giving access to leisure time, which at that time [leisure time] was a construct that only upper class people got to experience,” Rappaport said. Monica Villagomez Mendez Visitors to the Moreau Galleries examine the new exhibits, which showcase themes surrounding diaspora, architecture and travel.Also on display was Potter and Rappaport’s “Homeland: Chicago and Belgrade Diaspora,” which uses interviews with multi-generational artists and curators to explore the Serbian experience of moving to the United States and establishing a post-Yugoslavian society.Some of the images presented in the exhibit are taken from Chicago, which is known as the Serbian center of the United States, having a population of roughly 400,000 Serbian people. The exhibit displays quotes from the interviews on images of a Chicago Serbian neighborhood and of Belgrade.“Doing the interviews has been so amazing because there is no way that, even a student of international news and international history, that you could get these kind of personal stories without sitting down with people,” Rappaport said. “As an artist, I think we get to have permission to ask people personal questions and intimate questions, and for whatever reason, they open up to us really nicely.“It has been a real privilege and an incredible answer to my own curiosity about certain issues.”Potter spoke for both herself and Rappaport when she said this work has affected the way that they both see certain parts of the world.“Sometimes you make work and then you leave it behind, but this work has made me think a lot. I really learned from these interviewees, and this project has changed a lot of my opinions and attitudes about social situations,” Potter said.Tags: art opening, mat rappaport, melissa potter, moreau art galleries opening, moreau art gallery, spring exhibitionslast_img read more

first_imgThe people of the Iroquois Confederacy believe that “All members of Creation have spirits, and that, at the creation of Man, they were instructed that “We who walk about on the Earth are to express a great respect, an affection, and a gratitude toward all the spirits which create and support life ….. when people cease to respect and express gratitude for these many things, then all life will be destroyed, and human life on this planet will come to an end.” They believe that the Earth is our mother, and it’s true, as the Earth nurtures and cares for us all. But a caregiver has to be healthy to give care, and our Earth is anything but healthy.Overpopulation and our consumer society have lead to the pollution of air and water, destruction of forests, and leaching of soil fertility.  Soon, Mother Earth will no longer be able to care for us, and the Iroquois will be right.We will die out. You can help by conserving fossil fuels and think before you buy, “Do I really need this, or do I just want it?”Jahnn Swanker-GibsonJohnstownMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationBroadalbin-Perth’s Tomlinson seizing the day by competing in cross country and golf this fallEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen? Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinionlast_img read more