first_img“We have worked intensively to strengthen the levels of security through the exchange of information and through the implementation of coordinated actions along the common border,” he said during the event. The Armed Forces of Honduras and Nicaragua signed an agreement last month continuing their collaboration in the fight against drug trafficking and organized crime in border regions the two countries share, reporting positive results from the the joint Morazán-Sandino security campaign in 2014. By Dialogo May 15, 2015 “We have a very close relationship with Nicaragua. We carried out several operations last year to take care of that strip of land along the border that is sometimes neglected by the State,” Major General Díaz said in an interview with Diálogo. “In that sense we have established ongoing communications. Of course, the Central American Armed Forces Conference has helped us maintain this level of communication, and there is an ongoing coordinated patrol among the Armed Forces of Honduras and Nicaragua, the Armed Forces of Honduras and El Salvador, and the Armed Forces of Honduras and Guatemala.” “It is important to mention that since the creation of the Central American Armed Forces Conference (CFAC) in 1997, the exchange of information among the Armies in the region has been encouraged and strengthened in favor of regional security,” Rodrigues added. Working in cooperation, Service members from both countries have also seized control of 11 unauthorized border paths — known as “blind spots” — that organized crime operatives used to engage in human trafficking and to transport drugs and other contraband. Cajina, the RESDAL analyst, agreed that the Military forces of Honduras and Nicaragua are playing an important role in fighting organized crime. Sharing information is a key component of the agreement. “Any agreement of cooperation is essential to strengthen the fight against organized crime and drug related activities, but the terms, indicators, and outcomes are key,” said Roberto Cajina, a security and defense consultant who is a member of the Latin American Security and Defense Network (RESDAL, by its Spanish acronym.) Working in cooperation, Service members from both countries have also seized control of 11 unauthorized border paths — known as “blind spots” — that organized crime operatives used to engage in human trafficking and to transport drugs and other contraband. “I think the [Nicaraguan Army] has done great work to diminish the activity of organized crime domestically and, therefore, has contributed to lessen its impact in the countries of the region,” Rodrigues said. “The participation of the Military has become inevitable,” Cajina said. The role of the Armed Forces in fighting drug trafficking is likely to be temporary, with police forces from both countries eventually taking the lead role in the fight against drug trafficking, he said. Dismantling illegal routes The protocol will help both nations fight the common threat of organized crime, said Alfonso Rodrigues, from the Technical Council of the Nicaraguan Defense Ministry. During the second phase of the Morazán-Sandino operation, which took place April 1-12, Military forces from Honduras and Nicaragua aimed at drug trafficking and organized crime enterprises along the border the two countries share. The initiative achieved positive results: together, the Armies of Honduras and Nicaragua seized 850 kilos of cocaine, satellite phones, and high-caliber weapons. The Honduran Army also destroyed two illegal runways used by drug traffickers and seized 10 AK-47, M16, PS-90 and FAL rifles, hydraulic jacks for helicopters, five power plants, and two solar panels. Meanwhile, service members arrested at least 50 people, including seven who are accused of criminal offenses and 43 who had allegedly crossed the border illegally. Troops also seized 547 rounds of ammunition, 11 grenades, and seven ships used for drug trafficking. “It is important to mention that since the creation of the Central American Armed Forces Conference (CFAC) in 1997, the exchange of information among the Armies in the region has been encouraged and strengthened in favor of regional security,” Rodrigues added. “Any agreement of cooperation is essential to strengthen the fight against organized crime and drug related activities, but the terms, indicators, and outcomes are key,” said Roberto Cajina, a security and defense consultant who is a member of the Latin American Security and Defense Network (RESDAL, by its Spanish acronym.) “The participation of the Military has become inevitable,” Cajina said. The role of the Armed Forces in fighting drug trafficking is likely to be temporary, with police forces from both countries eventually taking the lead role in the fight against drug trafficking, he said. “I think the [Nicaraguan Army] has done great work to diminish the activity of organized crime domestically and, therefore, has contributed to lessen its impact in the countries of the region,” Rodrigues said. Sharing information is a key component of the agreement. Positive strategic progress Disabling these blind spots is important because drug trafficking organizations often try to transport drugs produced in South America through the border shared by Honduras and Nicaragua before moving them north to transnational criminal organizations in Mexico. In turn, Mexican drug cartels transport the drugs to the United States, Canada, and other destinations. The Chief of the Nicaraguan Army, General Julio César Avilés met in Managua with the Chief of the Honduran Armed Forces Joint Staff, Major General Freddy Santiago Díaz Zelaya, on April 22 to sign the protocol with the goal of strengthening security along the border the two countries share. The Chief of the Nicaraguan Army, General Julio César Avilés met in Managua with the Chief of the Honduran Armed Forces Joint Staff, Major General Freddy Santiago Díaz Zelaya, on April 22 to sign the protocol with the goal of strengthening security along the border the two countries share. Cajina, the RESDAL analyst, agreed that the Military forces of Honduras and Nicaragua are playing an important role in fighting organized crime. Positive strategic progress “We have worked intensively to strengthen the levels of security through the exchange of information and through the implementation of coordinated actions along the common border,” he said during the event. “We have a very close relationship with Nicaragua. We carried out several operations last year to take care of that strip of land along the border that is sometimes neglected by the State,” Major General Díaz said in an interview with Diálogo. “In that sense we have established ongoing communications. Of course, the Central American Armed Forces Conference has helped us maintain this level of communication, and there is an ongoing coordinated patrol among the Armed Forces of Honduras and Nicaragua, the Armed Forces of Honduras and El Salvador, and the Armed Forces of Honduras and Guatemala.” Since Honduran and Nicaraguan authorities signed the original set of cooperative agreements on April 25, 2014, the interdictions and seizures of drugs and weapons have contributed to a climate of security and tranquility for the populations that live in these border areas, General Avilés said. Dismantling illegal routes During the second phase of the Morazán-Sandino operation, which took place April 1-12, Military forces from Honduras and Nicaragua aimed at drug trafficking and organized crime enterprises along the border the two countries share. The initiative achieved positive results: together, the Armies of Honduras and Nicaragua seized 850 kilos of cocaine, satellite phones, and high-caliber weapons. The Honduran Army also destroyed two illegal runways used by drug traffickers and seized 10 AK-47, M16, PS-90 and FAL rifles, hydraulic jacks for helicopters, five power plants, and two solar panels. Meanwhile, service members arrested at least 50 people, including seven who are accused of criminal offenses and 43 who had allegedly crossed the border illegally. Troops also seized 547 rounds of ammunition, 11 grenades, and seven ships used for drug trafficking. Since Honduran and Nicaraguan authorities signed the original set of cooperative agreements on April 25, 2014, the interdictions and seizures of drugs and weapons have contributed to a climate of security and tranquility for the populations that live in these border areas, General Avilés said. The protocol will help both nations fight the common threat of organized crime, said Alfonso Rodrigues, from the Technical Council of the Nicaraguan Defense Ministry. The Armed Forces of Honduras and Nicaragua signed an agreement last month continuing their collaboration in the fight against drug trafficking and organized crime in border regions the two countries share, reporting positive results from the the joint Morazán-Sandino security campaign in 2014. Disabling these blind spots is important because drug trafficking organizations often try to transport drugs produced in South America through the border shared by Honduras and Nicaragua before moving them north to transnational criminal organizations in Mexico. In turn, Mexican drug cartels transport the drugs to the United States, Canada, and other destinations. last_img read more

first_img 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » The demise of the “unsinkable” Titanic serves as a timeless lesson to credit unions about potential pitfalls they might not see coming, says Michael Rasmussen, principal of GRC 20/20 Research.Credit union governance, risk, and compliance (GRC) provides a framework for diligently monitoring a multiplicity of influences that could disrupt sound operating models and strategies—an approach that might have prevented one of history’s most famous disasters.“The analogy here is that we are complicated business with many working parts, and their many areas where things can go wrong,” says Rasmussen, who addressed a general session at CUNA’s Governance, Risk Management, and Compliance Leadership Institute in Denver. “We need to see the big picture and the interconnectedness of risk.”The Titanic was hailed as unsinkable; prior to its tragic maiden voyage, captain E.J. Smith stated, “Never in our history have we harnessed such formidable technology.”last_img read more

first_imgOur little Lily got out of the house on Sunday the 14th. She is a Shepherd mix, light tan/golden color, super sweet but skittish around other people, has a curled tail when walking. Her last seen whereabouts were both on Lammer’s Pike and Coonhunters. She’s lost and scared and we just want our sweet angel back.Call 212-4243.last_img

first_imgPhoto: Mr. Horner’s test is guided by the steady hand of CT Technician, Lucinda Regan – submittedThe Fort St. John Hospital and Health Centre used its new CT Scanner for the first time yesterday. Patrick Horner was the first patient to undergo diagnostic imaging. The scan took about 10 minutes without any problems. Scanning will begin a regular schedule on February 2nd because the department needs time to adjust to the new equipment.- Advertisement –last_img

first_img Aszkenazy owns about 50 parcels in the city, from empty lots to clusters of apartments he’s refurbishing for senior housing. Over the last decade, he also has collected millions of dollars in tax subsidies – some with the support of a City Council gung-ho about revitalizing the city. w=12 l=16Twin empire In doing so, he has incurred the wrath of several community members who see his twin empire – as a developer who happens to own a weekly newspaper in the city – as a potentially toxic combination. “I think he’s a negative force in the community,” said Irene Tovar, a longtime activist and executive director of the Latin American Civic Association, a nonprofit housing group that operated more than a dozen Head Start programs until the federal government stepped in and terminated its contract. Tovar criticized Aszkenazy’s newspaper, The San Fernando Sun, for what she called unfair coverage. She said the newspaper’s reporting was one-sided and sought to avenge the association’s rejection of Aszkenazy’s proposal to do construction work for the association. The federal government ruled earlier this year that her association could not prove it could provide adequate child care facilities. “I think he uses the press to bully other people,” she said. Others have lobbed that allegation, complaining he is not building for the area’s poor residents and is forcing gentrification upon the city. But Aszkenazy, who grew up playing basketball in Pacoima and married his high school sweetheart, dismisses the charges. He said he doesn’t tell the Sun’s editors what to write about or how a story should be played, and neither does his wife, Martha Diaz-Aszkenazy, the publisher. In fact, he said, the only reason he goes in the newsroom – located in the same San Fernando building as his company’s office – is to fix the air conditioning. “I think some people find that hard to believe,” he said. “I am too busy. I don’t need to deal with that.” Aszkenazy’s first job – at age 12 – was working for an uncle, a plastering contractor. Following his uncle through construction sites, he picked up the art of negotiating. As an adult, he dropped out of college to join the Los Angeles Fire Department. He was attracted by the adventure. His wife took a different course, graduating from Loyola Marymount University with a business degree. Eventually, the two came together in 1985, deciding they had a natural fit to open a business. She would watch over the books, while he represented the public face for what eventually became Aszkenazy Development, where he’s the president and she’s the vice president. They also own Pueblo Contracting Inc., where she serves as president and he as vice president. The two have adjacent offices, but on the weekend try and pull away from the rush. Diaz-Aszkenazy said long ago she made it a priority that the family, with 17-year-old Aaron and 3-year-old Nathan, eat together. w=12 l=16Restored landmarks The time keeps their family strong both at their Los Feliz home and while the husband-and-wife team are at work. At first, the two delved into high-visibility projects, including refurbishing the historic Bullocks Wilshire building and the El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood. They also restored Angels Flight, a 298-foot rail system that runs along Bunker Hill in downtown Los Angeles. It was shut down in 2001 after eight people, including an 83-year-old Holocaust survivor, were injured when a cable unraveled; Aszkenazy’s company had to pay out $1 million. But over the last decade, the Aszkenazys have refocused their efforts closer to the home and heart. “We came to a community that many people felt was too risky to invest in,” Diaz-Aszkenazy said. “… You could have given stuff away. Nobody wanted to come here.” Over the last five years alone, city officials estimate the Aszkenazys have poured millions into properties unlike any other in the city, with small architectural details and walking plazas. Owners who operate businesses near the Aszkenazys say they have watched foot traffic increase and rents more than double in some cases. Less than a mile down the road from the Aszkenazys’ office sits the $2.7 million Library Plaza. The mission-inspired, open-air center includes a barbershop, coffeehouse and branch county library. Its tenancy allows Aszkenazy to secure a $3 million, 20-year rent agreement from the county and a $751,000 loan from the city, which credits the couple’s developments for kick-starting its revitalization plans. Across the street from the plaza stands another Aszkenazy project, replete with skylights, a ceramic fountain and wood floors. This one faces Sam Fernando City Hall and is the district office for Assemblywoman Cindy Montaez – whom he backed when she was the city’s mayor. There’s also a Cold Stone Creamery ice cream shop. His close physical proximity to power, critics charge, mirrors his personal relations with some city officials. Councilman Steve Veres, who is Montaez’s district director, once worked as an editor at the Sun and regularly has coffee with Aszkenazy at the House of Brews, a coffeehouse in the retail complex. w=12 l=16Rambler plan Not far from the coffeehouse stands another eye-catching development that has entangled Aszkenazy with City Hall politics. With a mini tower, faux trolley and 30-room inn next door, the project – centered around an old Rambler car dealership – celebrates the city as a former transportation hub. But the plaza’s centerpiece – a steakhouse – is populated with vintage cars instead of waitresses and tables. Occupying the old Rambler dealership, it was part of Aszkenazy’s plan to bring upscale restaurants to the city. But the plan stalled after city officials blocked his effort to obtain liquor permits. Aszkenazy accused the council of illegally denying his permit and sued, seeking $785,000 in damages – an amount that could throw the city’s budget into the red. He also accused council member Jose Hernandez of ethnic discrimination, voting down the permit because he believed Aszkenazy was Jewish. He further alleged Hernandez was motivated by vengeance after Aszkenazy’s newspaper exposed financial problems at the Latin American Civic Association – a nonprofit to which Hernandez had connections. All along, the city has maintained it acted lawfully. “He would not be the first developer denied a permit that sued, and he will not be the last,” said Michael Estrada, San Fernando’s city attorney, who asked council members not to speak on pending litigation. “We believe the city has a solid defense.” Meanwhile, supporters say developers are often cast as evil in small communities, but Aszkenazy, they say, does just the opposite. “There’s a lot of passion that goes into his work,” said Bruce Ackerman, CEO of the Economic Alliance of the San Fernando Valley. During the late 1970s, Ackerman ran the city’s Chamber of Commerce San Fernando and has long kept a close eye on its progress. “(The Aszkenazys) didn’t have to choose San Fernando,” he said. “They could have done these projects anywhere.” The lofts will keep young, upwardly mobile Latinos from leaving the neighborhood and keep empty nesters in town, he said. “San Fernando has such a heritage and cultural richness, and it has amazed me nobody had played to that richness.” Rachel Uranga, (818) 713-3741 [email protected] 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SAN FERNANDO – He’s sometimes introduced as the man who owns half the town. Though he lives more than 20 miles away, Severyn Aszkenazy arguably has more influence over San Fernando’s future than the mayor. The son of a Polish Jew and a Mexican-American mother who raised him alone on Pacoima’s rough streets, the developer is remaking the face of this economically struggling community, luring retailers who long shunned the area and erecting prize-winning facades. “I am the dreamer,” Aszkenazy said recently as he cruised in his 2004 Lincoln Navigator past a series of vacant lots where he’s planning to build live-work lofts. But some say the dreamer has created nightmares for the city – with accusations he is abusing his power with a local newspaper, and counters that some City Council members are trying to block his development out of political retribution. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals Still, his signature work is radically changing development here. His ambitious loft project alongside the Metrolink line could easily fit in any upscale neighborhood from Santa Monica to downtown Los Angeles, but Aszkenazy is building it in this largely Latino city of 24,000. Nearly 40 percent of the residents live below 200 percent of the poverty level, meaning a family of three earns less than $30,000 a year. But where other developers saw few opportunities to profit, the 45-year-old college dropout saw a rich community with a traditional downtown and a populace with strong, unmet desires to patronize high-end stores. “(Most developers) are going to build in neighborhoods where bankers can go to their bank. That won’t happen in places like San Fernando,” Aszkenazy said. “I have seen what kind of difference you can make. I can do this for a lot more time.” His critics, including some City Council members, don’t see the developer as altruistic. Instead, he is viewed as a greedy power player buying properties like Monopoly pieces and trying to strong-arm the city with a lawsuit. last_img read more

first_imgTags:#start#StartUp 101 Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting sramana mitra Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai…center_img This week’s roundtable had several interesting discussions around techniques for bootstrapping, both during the entrepreneur pitches, as well as during the Q&A. One of the most effective mechanics that I know for bootstrapping the early phases of a startup venture is by using services – consulting services, contact development work – such that you can achieve customer intimacy and also bring in revenue that can help fund your business. Even if you do product or IP development in parallel, that revenue stream is very valuable, as is the direct access to customer feedback. Some of my favorite entrepreneurs who have bootstrapped using services are Paul Kocher (Cryptography Research) and Jerry Rawls and Frank Levinson (Finisar).Lopworks Ltd.I gave this advice to one of today’s presenters: Ademola Osindero of Lopworks Ltd. from Nigeria. Ademola has a network integration services company for the last three to four years that generates revenues. But now he wants to build SaaS business apps for healthcare, for instance, and would like to raise $1M to do so. Well, the problem is that he doesn’t have any validation for the software business, and the chances of his raising money against an idea are slim. It is slim in a mature market like Silicon Valley, so I cannot believe that it has a prayer in a backward market like Africa. I advised Ademola to use his network integration services business to validate the healthcare IT product idea that he has, work with customers, build a product, and generate some revenue momentum by using the bootstrap using services principle.Q&AIn the Q&A someone asked how to bootstrap a B to C user-generated content site. Good question. This one is harder. One of the ways to do that is by offering market research data and analysis to the customers. It’s still a service, and it can turn into revenues quickly while giving you the runway to build your B to C business.Renewable Energy NowWe had Faith Kinslow start off by presenting her idea for Renewable Energy Now, which sounded like a content site through which she wants to raise funding for scientific research in alternative energy in universities. Well, I don’t see a business here, and advised her to use Facebook Causes for her fundraising interest. No need to waste precious time and energy in trying to build a business that has no chance. Magnetic PursenalityAnd then Karen Averill presented Magnetic Pursenality, a magnetic purse company that sources artisan products from wholesalers around the world, puts magnets on them, and sell through their website and other distribution channels. One of Karen’s goals is to help reduce global poverty by bringing the work of poor artisans into focus. Now it turns out that this is an area that I have done a lot of research on, and in my Vision India 2020 book, I have presented several projects around rural and slum development using similar ideas. However, there is one fundamental missing piece in Karen’s idea: design. Artisans in remote villages around the world have no clue about good design that sophisticated customers in the West are willing to spend money on. As a result, the products that Karen is selling on her website at this point are, pardon my bluntness, pretty ugly. Well, for a good cause or not, people simply don’t buy ugly products. So Karen either needs to work with a great designer who can provide designs to some artisans who execute against those designs. Or, she needs a great merchandiser who can pick a set of products that reflect taste. You cannot be in the fashion business without taste. This is a cardinal rule that cannot and should not be violated.We also had a discussion about channels. For Karen’s business, once the design problem is fixed, she has the option of selling in the B to C mode on her website, or in the B to B mode through catalogues. It turns out that she has done some great research to identify a set of catalogues that may be interested in buying her products wholesale. Her next step, therefore, is to validate that channel, and see how much appetite these companies have for her magnetic purses.ShabdMitraAt the end of the show, Ruchir Tewari introduced ShabdMitra, a mobile value-added service that takes English SMSs and converts them to one of the major Indian languages: Hindi, Bengali, Tamil, Telegu, Marathi, Gujarati, Kannada, etc. Assuming that his technology works, an extremely hard problem in itself, Ruchir’s questions were around his go-to-market strategy. He has designed some use cases, including one that I liked: Advertisers trying to reach rural consumers can send an SMS in English, which can then be translated and broadcast to various geographies of rural consumers in their respective languages. There are issues around the need for the ad copy to be cool, and such. But it is an idea worth validating with some advertising agencies and marketers of consumer goods who need to market to these vast masses of rural Indian consumers? If the value proposition resonates, then Ruchir can take it to a carrier along with a group of advertisers and start a pilot. The regular mobile VAS business model applies: If an advertiser sends 100,000 messages, paying Rs. 2 per message, the carrier will split the revenue with the VAS provider. But the first order of business is to check whether the advertisers want such a service!I started doing my free Online Strategy Roundtables for entrepreneurs in the fall of 2008. These roundtables are the cornerstone programming of a global initiative that I have started called One Million by One Million (1M/1M). Its mission is to help a million entrepreneurs globally to reach $1 million in revenue and beyond, build $1 trillion in sustainable global GDP, and create 10 million jobs. In 1M/1M, I teach the EJ Methodology which is based on my Entrepreneur Journeys research, and emphasize bootstrapping, idea validation, and crisp positioning as some of the core principles of building strong fundamentals in early stage ventures. In addition, we are offering entrepreneurs access to investors and customers through our recently launched our 1M/1M Incubation Radar series. You can pitch to be featured on my blog following these instructions.The recording of this roundtable can be found here. Recordings of previous roundtables are all available here. You can register for the next roundtable here.Sramana Mitra is a technology entrepreneur and strategy consultant in Silicon Valley. She has founded three companies, writes a business blog, Sramana Mitra on Strategy, and runs the 1M/1M initiative. She has a master’s degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her Entrepreneur Journeys book series, Entrepreneur Journeys, Bootstrapping: Weapon Of Mass Reconstruction, Positioning: How To Test, Validate, and Bring Your Idea To Market and her latest volume Innovation: Need Of The Hour, as well as Vision India 2020, are all available from Amazon. Photo by Grzegorz Rejniak 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Related Posts last_img read more

first_imgIt was a sparkling night for wildlife at the David Shepherd Wildlife Foundation’s annual Wildlife Ball.Kerry Ellis and Dr Brian MayCredit/Copyright: CPG PhotographyHosted by The Dorchester in London on Friday October 9th, 300 guests mingled with celebrities to help raise over £150,000 for endangered wildlife. A stunning set from legendary Queen guitarist, Dr Brian May and singer Kerry Ellis – which included the premier of Brian’s launch video for Cecil’s Law and an acoustic version of Crazy Little Thing Called Love – was followed on the big screen by a heartfelt appeal from former Spice Girl, Melanie C, for everyone to play their part to help save wildlife.“It was an incredible night for wildlife,” says CEO Sally Case. “The depth of support that we, as a small charity, generate illustrates just how important wildlife is to so many people and to the sustainable future of our planet and all of us, where ever we live.”Calling for supporters to be part of the generation that cares, David Shepherd’s granddaughters – the artist Emily Lamb and the Foundation’s event manager, Georgina Lamb – echoed the call for the younger generation to take up the baton to protect precious wildlife and wild spaces.Adding additional excitement to the evening were Mark King from Level 42 (who sang happy birthday to a guest raising £1,000), TV presenter and auctioneer Charlie Ross who helped command almost £60,000 in the live auction of artwork donated by the Shepherd family, British designer and supporter Elizabeth Emanuel, TV presenter Kate Silverton and Olympic gold medal winning rower Alex Gregory.last_img read more

first_img Related Items:#Freeportwomankilledbypolice, #magneticmedianews, #TheresaJessicaThompson Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBahamas, April 3, 2017 – Grand Bahama – The grand-daughter of former government minister and Member of Parliament for Marco City, David Thompson was that police reservist shot to death on the weekend in Grand Bahama.  Theresa Jessica Thompson-George, 24 years old was killed at a business on Oakes Street, gunned down and it has the island shaken up.  The young woman’s father is crying out on Facebook with tributes and photos and memories and questions.   Troy Thompson said, “I feel like I will cry for years and it’s hard to even think.  I lost my baby to the increasing violence in our country.”Police have not identified a motive as yet for the shooting on Saturday April 1 around 9:30pm which adds to the soaring murder count for The Bahamas.#MagneticMediaNews#TheresaJessicaThompson#Freeportwomankilledbypolicelast_img read more

first_imgSDSU West collects over 100,000 signatures for SDCCU stadium site proposal KUSI Newsroom Updated: 4:08 PM SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Backers of an initiative that would pave the way for San Diego State University to acquire the SDCCU Stadium property for campus expansion announced Friday that they have collected 100,000 petition signatures, far more than necessary to qualify for the ballot.“Supporters have successfully gathered many more than the required 71,646 signatures,” said Kim Kilkenny, of the Friends of SDSU Steering Committee.“Once verified, these signatures will qualify SDSU West for a 2018 ballot,” Kilkenny said. “With overwhelming support for SDSU and the positive impacts the university provides to our community, San Diegans clearly support SDSU West to ensure the Mission Valley stadium site is used to benefit the public, provide a place for SDSU to grow and thrive, and guarantee a permanent, public river park and open space.”The Friends group had until the end of March to collect signatures but members previously indicated that wanted to wrap up the signature drive by the end of the year. They plan to submit the petitions to the county Registrar of Voters next week.If enough signatures are verified, the City Council will decide whether to adopt the initiative or place it before voters. A competing initiative, which would result in a soccer-centric commercial development, qualified earlier this year and will go onto a 2018 ballot.It’s believed that if both SDSU West and SoccerCity are approved in an election, the one that receives the most votes would be adopted.The initiative would lead to the sale of the property to SDSU, which would be required to create a comprehensive development plan.Last month, school officials outlined their vision for the project, including 1.6 million square feet of classroom and research buildings, a river park and open space, 4,500 housing units, retail shops, a pair of hotels and a multi-use, 35,000-seat stadium for college football and other sports.SDSU Interim President Sally Roush and JMI Realty CEO John Kratzer said the project would be mostly funded by public-private partnerships, and wouldn’t rely on taxpayer financing. The main exception would be the stadium, which would be funded by bonds that are paid back by future revenues.The land is three trolley stops from the built-out main campus. December 29, 2017center_img Posted: December 29, 2017 Categories: Local San Diego News Tags: SDCCU Stadium, SDSU West FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom, last_img read more