first_imgThe names of a selection of South African products are now protected under a new agreement with the European Union (EU). It follows from a bilateral protocol on geographic indicators negotiated between the republic and the EU.South Africa said 102 wine names would be protected under the agreement and three agricultural product names, namely rooibos, Karoo lamb, and honeybush tea.In addition, an economic partnership agreement between the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and EU has been negotiated.#PostCab New agreement with EU will see 102 wine names, Karoo lamb, rooibos and honeybush (teas) names protected GD— EWN Reporter (@ewnreporter) May 26, 2016It allowed a single trade regime with the EU, said Minister in the Presidency Jeff Radebe, and “would enhance the preferential access of some products to the EU such as sugar, ethanol, wine, fish and fruit”, reported news website Business Day.“[The agreement] further demonstrates that our country is on a path to recovery and continues to be a viable investment destination,” the Cabinet said. “It ensures in line with the National Development Plan’s objectives that South Africa advances industrialisation and promotes South African exports into the EU market.”The agreement also promotes the development of regional value chains in Africa, contributing to regional integration.South Africa.info reporterlast_img read more

first_img“Education opens doors for everyone. My background is proof of that.” Dr. Fannie Sebolela (Image: Sulaiman Philip) 11 March 2014Khensani Primary School was once just another statistic in South Africa’s challenging education environment: run down, falling apart, and no place for children to learn. But Dr Fannie Sebolela has turned into the top performing school in the Tshwane District. It is no small achievement. Read more on Media Club South Africa: The principal who built a communitylast_img read more

first_img7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Related Posts If you want to give your kid every opportunity to succeed, it’s hard to argue with teaching them to code. Some of the wealthiest and most influential people of our time began programming young, and who wouldn’t want that kind of future for our kids?Yesterday, we reviewed Hopscotch, an iPad app that teaches children the basics of any modern programming language. However, that’s just one of the many options out there. Here are six free tools to get kids excited about code. Whether she’s 5 or 15, and whether she wants to learn Ruby or Java, there’s something here just for her:Scratch Age range: 8 and up Language: Original visual programming languagePlatform: Browser-basedWith over 3 million uploaded user projects, Scratch is undeniably popular. The visual language and interface was created at MIT Media Labs to get kids coding early, even if they can’t yet understand the complicated syntax that makes up written computer languages. In order to use it, kids just log onto the site and start dragging and dropping sprites and blocks of code. The results look something like early Flash projects.Since Scratch is a Turing-complete computer language, anything that kids can imagine, they can build.Alice Age range: 8 and up Language: Original object-oriented 3D programming languagePlatform: Windows, Mac, or Linux downloadAlice was designed by researchers at the University of Virginia as a gentle introduction to object-oriented programming. Its namesake, the Lewis Carroll heroine, stresses the researchers’ emphasis on making coding appealing to young girls. In Alice, draggable blocks of text instantly affect 3D sprites in a virtual world. Kids can test programs while that they create them, watching the sprites change in real time as they manipulate the block statements.Daisy the Dinosaur Age range: 5 to 8 Language: Basic logicPlatform: iPadThis program has the youngest audience of the list. Created by the makers of Hopscotch, this iPad app teaches the basics of programming logic in a way even kindergartners can understand. Kids can use ultra-basic blocks in order to animate Daisy the Dinosaur. Just drag one-word commands like “roll,” “jump,” and “grow,” into the programming space, and press play. Players can see a direct relationship between the commands they assign and the actions Daisy takes.Hackety-Hack Age range: 13 and up Language: RubyPlatform: Mac downloadTwo years ago, ReadWrite has reviewed Hackety-Hack as Ruby “for the absolute beginner.” Since then, it’s been recommended as an ideal introduction for teens. With cute graphics and simple explanations, teens can learn Ruby even if they’ve never touched another programming language before. The interface is divided into two screens, an “editor” for inputting commands and testing programs, and a lesson that clarifies the code in plain English. After the tutorial, users create and share basic games and programs.Code Monster Age range: 9 to 14 Language: JavaScriptPlatform: Browser-basedTo the uninitiated, technology can look a lot like magic. Code Monster takes away the complexities of writing JavaScript and leaves just that. It was created by Greg Linden, who wanted to teach his own kids how to code.This split screen tutorial places JavaScript on the left of the screen and images on the right. When kids alter the variables on the script side, the images transform instantly in response. Under the instruction of a friendly monster sprite, each new lesson brings new colors and shapes to the right side of the screen. Plus, the editor remembers your progress, directing you to the last lesson you completed each time you reopen the program.Codecademy Age range: 12 and up Language: Beginning programming syntaxPlatform: Browser-based.Codecademy has been touted as the tutorial to teach anyone to code, even disenfranchised populations, and yes, even preteens. It lacks the cartoony sprites and colorful interface of any of the other kid-targeted tutors on the list, but it’s still friendly and simple to grasp.Through Codecademy, kids as young as 12 can get started in Python, Ruby, PHP, HTML, or JavaScript, even APIs. The tutorial is also trying to expand its appeal to young beginning programmers with its After-School Programming effort, encouraging students and educators to start a programing club at their schools.Did we miss a programming tool your kid loves to use? Let us know in the comments.Image courtesy of Shutterstock Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid Tags:#developers#education#kids#learn to code#women in tech center_img How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? lauren orsini Why You Love Online Quizzeslast_img read more

first_imgAbout the authorFreddie TaylorShare the loveHave your say ​Man Utd manager Solskjaer: Wins cause for optimismby Freddie Taylor10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveManchester United boss Ole Gunnar Solskjaer admits that winning is keeping everyone happy at the club.Solskjaer has started with two wins out of two games, away to Cardiff and at home against Huddersfield.Now they face another home test against an impressive Bournemouth side on Sunday.When asked about the mood in the camp, United’s interim boss said in his press conference:”Whenever you win games, everyone’s happy so let’s keep that run going, we’ve got a performance against Bournemouth.”These two games have been fantastic, my first game and first game at Old Trafford, that’s new and keep that momentum going against Bournemouth and when you lose a game you won’t see many smiles about.” last_img read more

first_imgMichigan Stadium on a rainy day.InstagramMichigan freshman Ahmir Mitchell transferring after suspension.Ahmir Mitchell enrolled at Michigan early, but it doesn’t look like he’s ever going to play a down for the Wolverines. Wednesday, just days after it was announced by head coach Jim Harbaugh that the freshman wide receiver would be suspended indefinitely, Mitchell announced on Twitter that he’d be leaving the program.“It’s been all love from the fans, community, and the people of Michigan. I’ve made bonds and friendships with people here that will last a lifetime. I love what U of M had to offer me but, what is best for me and my family comes first. Therefore I will like to announce that I am hereby reopening my recruitment to all Universities and football programs.”Mitchell specifically stated that he’s “reopening’ his recruitment. But since he’s been enrolled at Michigan since January, this would have to be considered a transfer.All love for the people of Michigan and U of M ?? pic.twitter.com/dATIELCJQe— Ahmir_SoDevoted (@TheDeuce_2_Nice) August 24, 2016Mitchell is a class of 2016 player who was rated as a four-star composite. The 6-foot-3, 205-pound star is from Egg Harbor City, New Jersey.Reasons for Mitchell’s suspension have not been released. Harbaugh became frustrated with the press when asked about it last week.last_img read more

first_imgTrina Roache APTN National NewsThe National Arts Centre orchestra took its tribute to a Mi’kmaq poet to Eskasoni, the home of the late Rita Joe Wednesday.Her 15 line poem called “I lost my talk” has become a twenty minute performance.The tribute highlights the key role the arts play in reconciliation.last_img

As two of the faces of United States and international soccer, retired forward Abby Wambach and current midfielder Megan Rapinoe have used their platforms to act as leaders for various social issues, such as LGBT and women’s rights. But now, following in the steps of another former U.S. women’s national team star, Brandi Chastain, Wambach and Rapinoe have plans to make a difference in an entirely different way.In an interview with The Lantern before the two spoke at Ohio State for an event sponsored by OUAB, Wambach disclosed that she has made arrangements to have her brain donated for concussion research. Rapinoe later revealed the same during the event.“I think it’s amazing. I’m going to do the same myself,” Wambach said of Chastain’s pledge to donate. “Actually, I’m going to be doing a piece with her in order to get the word out, and I think that will be so important not just for the next generation, but to learn more.”Wambach later added that the piece with Chastain is set to be a podcast.Chastain, known for her game-winning penalty kick and ensuing celebration in the 1999 FIFA Women’s World Cup Final, announced her intentions in early March, becoming one of the most prominent female athletes to do so.The 35-year-old Wambach, the all-time leading goal scorer in international soccer, could prove especially valuable in the research due to her propensity to use her head on the pitch. Of her 184 goals in international play, 77 were deposited using her head.“I think there will be valuable research and information that will be studied, and we will understand more about the heading and the heading process as it pertains to the game,” Wambach said.During the OUAB event, Rapinoe acknowledged that she’s unsure how much information could be gathered from her brain, as she does not use her head to the extent of Wambach. Even so, she said she felt it necessary to contribute to the burgeoning research on concussions. Boston University, where Chastain plans to donate her brain, is the lead researcher on the field of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy, a postmortem degenerative brain disease that is suspected to be linked to concussions and repeated blows to the head. However, only seven of the 307 brains studied by Boston University belonged to a female, according to The New York Times, which adds salience to the commitments of the three U.S. soccer players. CTE, initially linked to boxing, is now commonly associated with football, as the first large-scale findings on the disease came after Dr. Bennet Omalu published a paper in 2005 on former NFL center Mike Webster. Since the initial report, the list of NFL players diagnosed with CTE continues to grow. An October study from the Department of Veteran Affairs and Boston University found the disease in 87 of the 91 brains of former NFL players that were examined. Despite the repeated linkage to football, research on the disease and the impacts of head trauma is developing beyond gridiron, namely to soccer. Boston University discovered CTE in the brain of a deceased 29-year-old soccer player in 2014, the first named player to have traces of it. A 2013 study from Yeshiva University found abnormalities in the brains of soccer players who frequently head the ball that are similar to patients who have sustained concussions. The study noted a single header is not enough to result in traumatic brain injuries, but the lead author, Dr. Michael Lipton, wrote that “repetitive heading could set off a cascade of responses that leads to degeneration of brain cells over time.”As a preventive measure in young players, the U.S. Soccer Federation put forth new safety guidelines in November, banning headers for players under 10 years old, while limiting it in practice for those aged 11 to 13. Wambach said she fully supports safety measures to protect youth players, but she is advocating that there are better ways to go about it than simply banning headers altogether.“We want to make sure that when those 10-year-olds get to that 11-year-old age, the 11- to (13-year-olds) get to the next level, we want to make sure those kids are prepared,” she said. “You don’t want to send somebody out and not know how to do it, how to properly head a ball. I think that actually makes it more dangerous.“If you can do it technically sound, you’re less likely to incur a concussion. In fact, most concussions come from elbow-to-elbow or head-to-head contact, and that’s something that’s a little not talked about.”She said that because of this belief, she is working with the federation to instill new programs to teach proper technique when heading the ball.“I’m setting up a protocol with U.S. Soccer at this point to create a business in and around some of these clubs with soft balls to properly teach how to technically head a soccer ball, how to attack a soccer ball, to not be afraid of heading a soccer ball, because I don’t foresee soccer ever losing heading as part of its game,” Wambach said.Soccer might not be a sport noted for its spine-tingling collisions or overtly physical nature. But Wambach said that is precisely why she thinks research into the effects of the sport could prove invaluable to future generations.“We’re different from the NFL,” she said. “Heading a ball is different than getting struck in the head by a linebacker that’s 300 pounds trying to literally rip your head off, so I’m excited to see what those results are.”Nick Clarkson contributed to this story. read more

Ohio State sophomore forward Dakota Joshua’s initial reaction following his go-ahead goal in the third period against Minnesota at the Schottenstein Center on Feb. 11. OSU lost 6-5. Credit: Jacob Myers | Assistant Sports EditorFor the first time since 2009, the Ohio State men’s hockey team is headed to the NCAA tournament.Despite falling to the Wisconsin Badgers in the Big Ten tournament semifinals, the Buckeyes (21-11-6) secured an at-large big in the West region of the 16-team field.The Scarlet and Gray will travel to Fargo, North Dakota, to take on No. 2 overall seed Minnesota Duluth (25-6-7) in the first round, and will have a chance to advance to the final eight of the competition for the first time since the program reached its only Frozen Four during the 1997-1998 season.Puck drop from Fargo is set for Friday at 6:30 p.m. on ESPNU.While the Buckeyes might not have NCAA tournament experience, their coach, Steve Rohlik, does. Much of that experience was with OSUs first-round opponent.Rohlik spent 10 seasons as an assistant at Minnesota Duluth from 2001 to 2010. He was hired along with the Bulldogs 17-year head coach Scott Sandelin, who has taken Duluth to seven NCAA appearances, two Frozen Fours and won one national championship. Rohlik was on the staff for two of those appearances and one Frozen Four. He became OSU’s associate head coach in 2011 when Duluth won the national championship.“I know their team very well. They have as much speed as anybody in the country,” Rohlik said. “Top to bottom, there’s no secret why they’ve been No. 1 or 2 all year. They’ve done it because they’re that good.”Jacob Myers contributed quotes. read more

first_imgWales manager Ryan Giggs is expecting an extra motivated Gareth Bale ahead of their games with Spain and the Republic of IrelandThe Real Madrid winger had been a doubt for Wales after sustaining an apparent groin injury in last weekend’s 0-0 draw with Atletico Madrid.Despite missing Real’s Champions League defeat at CSKA Moscow on Tuesday, Bale was reportedly given the all-clear after a medical examination and is hopeful of making a comeback for Saturday’s La Liga game with Alaves.Now Bale’s inclusion in the Wales team all but confirms the reports with Giggs insisting that he had no hesitation on naming Bale in the squad.“He (Bale) had a little groin strain but the scan came back all clear and he expects to be involved at the weekend, which is good,” Giggs said in a press conference.“Every player’s motivation will be high for a number of reasons.“You’re playing for your country first and foremost, playing against a very good team and it’s a chance to test yourself.“It’s also at the Millennium (where Wales have not played since 2011), so it’s a different stadium and all the players will be motivated).David Villa, SpainQuiz: How much do you know about David Villa? Boro Tanchev – September 14, 2019 Time to test your knowledge about Spanish legendary forward David Villa.“But with Gareth playing in Spain there’ll be added motivation for him, I’m sure.”Arsenal midfielder Aaron Ramsey was also been included in the 25-man Wales squad, despite missing the Gunners’ Europa League trip to Azerbaijan to stay with his pregnant wife.Wales will face Spain on October 11 at Cardiff in a friendly before travelling to the Republic of Ireland five days later for a UEFA Nations League game.Wales Squad:Goalkeepers: Wayne Hennessey (Crystal Palace), Danny Ward (Leicester City), Adam Davies (Barnsley)Defenders: Ashley Williams (Stoke City, on loan from Everton), James Hester (Aston Villa), Ben Davies (Tottenham Hotspur), Chris Gunter (Reading), Connor Roberts (Swansea City), Christopher Mepham (Brentford), Jazz Richards (Cardiff City), Ethan Ampadu (Chelsea), Paul Dummett (Newcastle United), Declan John (Swansea City)Midfielders: Joe Allen (Stoke City), Aaron Ramsey (Arsenal), Andy King (Leicester City), David Brooks (Bournemouth), Matthew Smith (FC Twente, on loan from Manchester City)Forwards: Gareth Bale (Real Madrid), Ben Woodburn (Sheffield United, on loan from Liverpool), Harry Wilson (Derby County), Tom Lawrence (Derby County), Sam Vokes (Burnley), George Thomas (Scunthorpe United, on loan from Leicester City), Tyler Roberts (Leeds United)last_img read more