first_imgGot a rugby book or DVD you’d like us to review in the Armchair Zone? Email [email protected] article appeared in the September 2010 issue of Rugby World MagazineDo you want to buy the issue of Rugby World in which this article appeared? Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit http://mags-uk.com/ipc TAGS: Book Review LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. What do you get when you mix one of the world’s leading sports historians with one of the best sports archives bar none? One hell of a read, that’s what. Tony Collins, Professor of Social History at Leeds Metropolitan University, devoted four years to scrutinizing RFU and IRB minutes at Twickenham, then writing this remarkable history of our game. “I wanted to get behind the myths,” he says, “but also to give the sport the same serious attention as you might see in a political or military history.”A 15-page bibliography testifies to the thoroughness of his work, and as a rugby league fan he admits to being shocked by the extent to which union’s rulers ostracized those of their own who had links – however tenuous – with the professional code. The RFU’s ‘scorched earth’ policy adopted after the 1895 schism alienated many amateurs in England’s north, but paradoxically did union a power of good. Had England had the pick of every rugby player in the land, they might have dominated for decades; instead, the likes of Wales, South Africa and New Zealand were able to take on and beat the Mother Country, giving rise to union’s global popularity. Not until 1986 could amateur players move freely between the two codes, and as late as 1994 Ady Spencer was forced to withdraw from the Varsity Match because he also played rugby league.Union’s relationship with league is but one plank of a book that neatly divides rugby’s history into social themes: class, money, war, imperialism. For those with a studious bent who missed it when it first appeared last year, Collins’s work is a must for your bookshelf.RW RATING 5/5BUY IT AT:  Routledge.com RRP:  £19.99  PUBLISHED BY:  Routledgelast_img read more

first_imgAUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND – FEBRUARY 17: Head coach of the Highlanders Jamie Joseph prior to the Super Rugby trial match between the Blues and the Highlanders at Unitec on February 17, 2012 in Auckland, New Zealand. (Photo by Hannah Johnston/Getty Images) Starting XV:1 Jamie Mackintosh (C)2 Andrew Hore3 Chris King4 Josh Bekhuis5 Nick Crosswell6 Adam Thomson7 John Hardie8 Nasi Manu9 Aaron Smith10 Lima Sopoaga11 Hosea Gear12 Phil Burleigh13 Tamati Ellison14 Buxton Popoali’i15 Ben Smith Jamie Joseph has made three changes to the side that took on Chiefs last weekendHighlanders’ Head Coach, Jamie Joseph, has named his team to play the Crusaders at Forsyth Barr Stadium, Saturday 3 March at 06:35am (gmt).Two changes have been made to the run-on team that beat the Chiefs in Hamilton last weekend.Aaron Smith comes in at halfback for Jimmy Cowan who moves to the reserves and Lima Sopoaga makes his first start for the season, replacing Chris Noakes who injured his ankle in the season opener.The reserves bench sees the return of All Black Colin Slade to the 22 and Telusa Veainu comes in for Kurt Baker who drops down to the Highlanders Development team, who are playing their Crusader counterparts at 4pm at the University grounds. Reserves16 Jason Rutledge17 Bronson Murray18 Culum Retallick19 James Haskell20 Jimmy Cowan21 Colin Slade22 Telusa VeainuInjured Update:  Jarrad Hoeata (shoulder), Siale Piutau (ankle), Kade Poki (knee), Kenny Lynn (neck), Shaun Treeby (knee), Ma’afu Fia (hamstring) & Chris Noakes (ankle). LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

first_imgnot for featured Mike Ross was injured in the first scrumLet’s go for the obvious one and start with the scrum. Ireland hadn’t lost a scrum in the Championship until their visit to Twickenham where they lost three and only won the same amount. England on the other hand won 11 and lost 1. It is easy to blame the injury to Mike Ross and point the finger at Tom Court but a scrum is not built on one man alone. How did Ireland not generate more force through the second rows? Why didn’t the flanker engage and aid the prop more? The line-out which cost them so dear against Wales and France was a success but an international side cannot win if they can’t generate quality first phase ball on a regular basis. Add to this the high number of handling errors and knock-ons and it tells an uncomfortable story.These are questions that Kidney will have to look at himself to find the answers. Graham Rowntree (the only member of the England coaching squad to come out of the 2011 World Cup with any credit) highlighted the need of quality coaching in that area. It is unacceptable at international level for the set piece to be so controlled by one side. England scored two tries, both from set piece penalties. Paul O’Connell was sorely missed up front as he would have taken ownership and dealt with the issues but it seemed that Ireland became rudderless in the second half and just allowed the scrum to disintegrate before their very eyes.Throughout the tournament, discipline has been an issue for Ireland and in wet and tricky conditions at Twickenham this took on greater significance. Ireland conceded 12 penalties, double the amount of the English, which away from home against a good kicker makes it very difficult to win. By the time you add on 11 missed tackles to England’s six, it underlines that this was just a terrible day for Kidney’s men. Ireland’s scrum was dominated at TwickenhamBy Claire Glancy What a shocker! This generation of Ireland players and fans have got so used to beating England in the last decade that with this year’s match rounding off the tournament on St Patrick’s Day, the script for another Irish victory seemed to be written.Not so.After an error-ridden first half, with both sides relying on the kickers to rack up points, Ireland were still in the hunt. England took a three point lead into the break but the perception was they were having to work much harder than their opponents and if Ireland were to step up a gear then again this game would be theirs. But if there was a gear change at all, the men in green went into reverse and Ireland suffered another attack of second-half phobia (an all too familiar trait in this Championship) and produced what was arguably their worst performance under Declan Kidney.Throughout the Six Nations the two major worries for Ireland have been their set piece and discipline. Since the opening the defeat to Wales, defence has been their strength. But on Saturday, all three areas were the fundamental the reasons behind the 30 – 9 defeat. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Kearney has performed well for IrelandThe loss will hurt all involved but it will be interesting to see how the players and staff react. There have been a few positives throughout the Six Nations, particularly the performances of Stephen Ferris and Rob Kearney. As everyone knows, the talent is there, so Ireland do not need to panic but they do need to take action.  Their set piece has to improve if they are ever going to win major tournaments and they have to sort out the midfield… In truth Gordon D’Arcy looks a shadow of the great player he once was and while Brian O’Driscoll should be back in time for the summer tour to New Zealand, a plan needs to be formulated for the post-BOD era. Only two wins from five was not the Championship Ireland were expecting. Yes, a number of the players can turn their attention to the Heineken Cup quarter-finals but right now that’s little consolation.Follow Claire Glancy on Twitter @claireglancylast_img read more

first_imgAccording to reports Down Under, McCaw is set to captain New Zealand against Samoa in his first ever Test in Apia, next week. Ofisa Treviranus has been named already as the man to skipper the Samoans in that contest.Try telling either of these men that captaincy is overrated. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Tunnel vision: Richie McCaw runs out for his 100th cap as captain According to very local legend, the Crusaders had a training session one day and during the warm-up McCaw got talking to a younger player. McCaw was telling the younger man that he should smarten up his social life, become a bit more sensible. Apparently the younger man laughed back, with something along the lines of “what, so I can be boring like you?”The story goes that McCaw stopped running alongside the younger player, turned, and headed for the stands. He sat there. Thinking of his next moce. Depending on who you ask, one of the other senior players seriously scalded the plucky youngster, while others suggest no one wanted say a thing, giving the gesture real impact. You imagine, true or false, that no one would have to say anything. The younger player was said to have shrunk back into himself, mortified.Putting in a shift: Ofisa Treviranus facing England in 2014Now, in the last few seasons it has become evident that, on the pitch, McCaw is not infallible. He has been penalised. He has been carded. He has had to shift shirt numbers so that others can get a game at No 7. However, for so many, with McCaw in his role as a captain, it is disgusting even to consider taking pops at him – particularly if he offers his time and guidance.Maybe there is not really a cult of the captain in rugby. Maybe it is only the leaders of the successful teams we remember. Certainly it is true that captains cannot lead the defence every time, and call all the lineouts and dictate back moves. But it is hard to believe that there is not a high level of respect rolled out for the battered pitch-bosses who barely squeek before and during a game, but who take on big decisions and a punishing calendar without any hint of fuss.center_img There are those in rugby who believe the role of captain is a ceremonial post. There are those who believe the word demands a capital ‘C’. Some believe the loss of a good captain could derail the mightiest side. Others think most captains are easily replaced.Even last week England skipper Chris Robshaw answered a question on the role of captains by saying: “From the outside world you view it as management, captain, players, and it’s so much more than that. You have a number of leaders on the pitch who run the attack and defence, and who are just big characters in the squad who drive standards and lift the guys if something needs to be said. You have ten or 15 in the squad.”This sounds like even the on-field leader of one of the world’s top sides is happy to take a back-seat through many facets of decision-making with England. He goes on to explain that there are nuances of being a captain – listening to your team-mates is an underrated skill, he says – but also hints that you don’t need to be a great orator to lead well.It’s a point worth considering as we plummet towards the Rugby World Cup, tumbling ever nearer to that tangle of pointless rhetoric, hype and hashtags. Most of the time it can be the unsaid that is important.Calling the shots: Chris Robshaw during England’s World Cup preparationsMartin Johnson has often stated that captaincy was overrated, but then this is a man who his charges have described in hushed awe, telling tales of when he grabbed the scruffs of two opponents at the one time or when he simply looked back down the tunnel before the 2003 World Cup final and said nothing. It’s easy to say being captain is overrated when you’re doing it really well. Some captain have the charisma of a can of beans, but if we’re still talking about the other impressive captains 12 years later, it’s safe to assume they had something about them.Not many Kiwis would say the role of skipper is a waste of time. Not with Richie McCaw still clawing about a rugby field. This is a man who willed his foot not to fall off during an entire successful World Cup campaign; a man who could go down as the greatest All Black ever.Last year I was fortunate enough to tour New Zealand as England chugged through a three-Test series, and as I passed through Christchurch – and once I got over the arresting, lingering desolation of the city centre – I chatted to a few locals in the rugby community. There was a story that came up more than once. TAGS: Samoa last_img read more

first_img The power of Kyushu: Mount Aso, the largest active volcano in Japan, is part of the breathtaking scenery Advertising featureKyushu, the must-do destination for fans going to the 2019 Rugby World CupIt’s less than a year until Rugby World Cup 2019 kicks off in Japan, with the hosts opening the tournament against Russia on Friday 20 September. Games will take place across the country, with the spotlight in particular on Japan’s southern main island of Kyushu, which stages some important fixtures in the Fukuoka, Oita and Kumamoto prefectures.Kyushu will be hosting many of the top-ranked nations expected to compete for the cup, including New Zealand, Wales, Australia and Ireland. With former Japan coach Eddie Jones’s England team also making Miyazaki prefecture their training camp base during the tournament, Kyushu will be an enticing destination for fans of the game.As well as the rugby, Kyushu promises a wealth of cultural and gourmet discoveries across diverse natural environments, making it well worth a visit for rugby fans from all over the world. Here we outline Kyushu’s main attractions and the top things to do and see during a visit here during the 2019 Rugby World Cup…Grand venue: Kumamoto Kenko Stadium, where Wales and France will both be in action at RWC 2019Where is Kyushu? The main factsLocated at the western edge of Japan, Kyushu is about half the size of Scotland, yet home to seven prefectures. Fukuoka, Kumamoto, Nagasaki, Oita and Saga are located to the north, with Kagoshima and Miyazaki in the south.Kyushu offers a unique charm in comparison to the rest of Japan, being a compact region that combines both urban and natural environments – perfect for spending time during the tournament. The region offers a range of sightseeing attractions, including hot springs, volcanoes and historical landmarks, while Kyushu’s local cuisine is revered nationally.In addition, Kyushu is pleasingly affordable compared to Tokyo and the Kansai/Kyoto area, with any trip here offering good value as well as a huge range of hotels and minpaku private lodgings to choose from when staying.Thanks to Kyushu’s international airport in Fukuoka, the region can be reached in less than two hours from Asia’s main transit hubs, such as Incheon, Shanghai, Hong Kong and Tokyo itself. For visitors travelling by Japan’s famous shinkansen bullet train – where the Japan Rail (JR) Pass offers great value – Kyushu can be reached in about two hours from Osaka.Kyushu’s Rugby World Cup DestinationsFUKUOKAWelsh fans will definitely want to consider being based in Kyushu’s Fukuoka prefecture. Not only is the team’s training camp located here but neighbouring Oita and Kumamoto will be hosting two of their matches: Wales v Fiji (Wed 9 Oct) and Wales v Uruguay (Sun 13 Oct).Fukuoka has been Kyushu’s biggest city since ancient times, and has flourished as a place where visitors can enjoy the culture by day or night.During the day, the region offers such historical sacred sites as the Dazaifu Tenmangu shrine, dedicated to Sugawara Michizane. For those feeling far from home, the main street’s Starbucks may offer a welcome break – it’s worth a visit just to admire the unique wood lattice store design and sport connection. It’s the work of famous Japanese architect, Kengo Kuma, who is also designing the National Olympic Stadium for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics.Place of worship: the Tenmangu shrine at Dazaifu, dedicated to a great scholar of the Heian periodLattice pray: the stunning wood design by architect Kengo Kuma that adorns Starbucks in FukuokaFurther afield in the Izuka area, the Former Residence of Ito Denemon offers traditional architecture and Japanese gardens; it provides tranquillity and the chance to step into the past, offering scenes reminiscent of a miniaturised Kyoto of sorts.By night, Fukuoka offers a vibrant nightlife, thanks to its diverse entertainment and shopping culture, and the city’s many bars and restaurants.But to experience Fukuoka properly you must visit one of the many yatai street-food stalls in the evening, where you can eat and drink alongside the locals and really get a feel for what this city is about. For their size, yatai stalls offer a surprising menu, anything from ramen, gyoza and oden to yakitori or beef and vegetable skewers.Hitting the street: eat and dine alongside locals at a yatai food stall – you’ll love the range of optionsFor those looking to celebrate a rugby win with a few more drinks, there are many tachinomi standing bars around the city open until late.Fukuoka is the home of Tonkotsu ramen, which is made from pork-bone broth noodles. With ramen culture steadily gaining in popularity around the world, trying the local Tonkotsu ramen comes recommended with a visit to Fukuoka; many of the top nationwide brands, such as Ichiran and Ippudo, are originally from this city.Besides ramen, Fukuoka is renowned for its Mentaiko (spicy salted cod roe), Motsunabe (beef/pork tripe), Tetsunabe gyoza (pan-fried, Chinese-style dumplings) and local favourite Suke-san udon noodles, served with burdock tempura. Its unique food culture makes it highly rated among Japanese, with the city seen as one of Japan’s top gourmet cities.Fukuoka Hakatanomori Stadium2-1-1 Higashihirao Koen, Hakata-ku Fukuoka, 816-0052Capacity: 22,563Access:25 min by bus from Hakata Station15 min by bus from Fukuoka Airport (5 min by taxi) TAGS: Japan Fixtures:France v Tonga (Sun 6 Oct)Wales v Uruguay (Sun 13 Oct) MIYAZAKIFor those cheering on Eddie Jones’s England team at this World Cup, the tropical climes of southern Miyazaki prefecture should be on your itinerary. The England squad’s training camp is located here, with potentially a quarter-final appearance in neighbouring Oita Stadium to look forward to.Miyazaki prefecture is known as the stage for many of Japan’s mythical legends, and provides a mystical setting thanks to its many famous ‘power spots’. These are locations thought to be flowing with mystical energy, and particularly include Takachiho Gorge and its dragon scale-esque rocky basalt cliffs, waterfalls and emerald waters.For those staying in the Takachiho area, don’t miss seeing a sacred Yokagura (night kagura) dance performance at Kagura-den, held daily from 8pm. The performance retells popular folklore tales and an English handout explains the plot to help you enjoy the story.Rocky paradise: basalt cliffs, waterfalls and emerald waters make Miyazaki a delight for nature loversEnjoy the show: a Yokagura dance performance in Takachiho, which relate popular folklore talesSouth of central Miyazaki City, Aoshima island provides a paradisiacal retreat along the eastern coast, with a large red torii gate on arrival on the beach, and basalt rock formations making for a fantastic view. The shrine here is said to offer good luck for marriage, making it a romantic visit for couples or those looking for love.For those looking for a little more luck (perhaps before one of the World Cup games!), Udo Shrine further south along the Nichinan Coast is an idyllic shrine built into the cliff-face overlooking the ocean. It provides impressive panoramic views.The shrine itself is set inside a small cave and there is a rock face outside that is said to bring good luck – if you can hit it with one of the small ceramic lucky balls available at the shrine.Door to paradise: the red torii gate on Aoshima island, which has breathtaking basalt rock formationsMiyazaki also has a rich food culture, from mangos to chicken, and local craft beers, such as Hideji Beer. Chicken Nanban – deep-fried chicken served with a tartar sauce – is a dish loved across Japan that originates from Miyazaki prefecture. It’s easy to find at many of Miyazaki’s restaurants, where chargrilled Jitokko free-range chicken is also served, often alongside a spicy Yuzu Kosho (citrus pepper) sauce.Tartar for now: Chicken Nanban, a national favourite, originates from the Miyazaki prefectureKAGOSHIMAA fascinating experience is also guaranteed in the Kagoshima prefecture in the far south, which shares a strong historical connection with England. Despite the initial conflict of the 1863 Satsuma-England War (Satsuma being the old name for modern-day Kagoshima), what followed was a series of exchanges that helped forge deep ties between the two.The tale of the Satsuma Students tells how 19 Japanese students defied the Tokugawa ban on foreign travel and set sail abroad, eventually arriving in England with the goal of learning all about Western science and technology to bring back home. Upon their return, they were quickly followed by a trail of key English engineers and doctors, who were invited to Kagoshima in the following years.In addition, Admiral Togo, a great naval hero and admiral of the Imperial Japanese Navy, was originally born in Kagoshima and spent much of his early life studying and training in Britain before returning to a successful career in the Japanese navy.Kagoshima promises mesmerising views of Sakurajima island from most parts of the capital city – it’s technically still an active volcano and typically erupts a few times each week, albeit on a minor scale. It’s certainly a sight to behold if you set eyes on an ash cloud.Close-up view: the volcano on Sakurajima island, 4km from Kagoshima, erupts a few times each weekFans of the classic James Bond films may also be aware of Kagoshima’s significance, with Mount Shinmoe-dake, further north of Kagoshima City itself, featured in the 1967 spy film You Only Live Twice as the location of SPECTRE’s secret headquarters.One of the best places to view Sakurajima is from inside Sengan-en, a UNESCO World Heritage Site on the western coast of Kagoshima Bay. The grounds here offer a beautiful Japanese garden and peak inside a traditional Japanese house, occupied by several generations of the Shimadzu family.Beauty by the bay: Sengan-en, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is a great viewing point for SakurajimaTravel – how to get aroundThe Kyushu Shinkansen, or bullet train, connects Fukuoka in the north and Kagoshima in the south, offering a convenient journey time of about 1 hour 20 minutes one way.The rest of Kyushu is covered well by a combination of local trains and regional express trains, with a large number of Sightseeing Trains also providing more scenic routes, added comfort and local culture (this is one of the best ways to travel between Kumamoto and Kagoshima – via the Isaburo Shimpei and Hayato no Kaze services).Kyushu is also well connected by bus, with the SunQ pass offering unlimited bus travel for multiple days (including highway and local buses). Choose from the All Kyushu 4-day Pass (14,000 yen), the All Kyushu 3-day Pass (11,000 yen), the Northern Kyushu 3-day Pass (9,000 yen) or the Southern Kyushu 3-day Pass (8,000 yen).All the passes except the Southern pass also include bus travel to and around the Shimonoseki area in neighbouring Yamaguchi prefecture. Over at Umi Jigoku, this ‘sea hell’ offers cobalt-blue hot spring waters steaming away against a backdrop of red torii gates, whereas the nearby Oniishibozu Jigoku promises an encounter with boiling mud pools. Other highlights include Chinoike Jigoku – blood-red waters – and the Tatsumaki Jigoku, which erupts every 30 minutes in a hot geyser.Fancy a dip? The Chinoike Jigoku spring gets its blood-red colour from oxidised iron and magnesiumIn recent years, travellers have come from many countries to discover Yufuin, a popular spring resort about 10km inland from Beppu. But many other unique hot springs can be found in this region too, including the secluded and magical Yunohira Onsen town area.These areas offer a more tranquil, relaxing and soothing experience, and were historically visited by Japanese to recuperate and recover from various ailments thanks to the restorative powers of the hot spring waters — don’t be surprised to see the rugby players themselves make a trip here!Yufuin itself is comparable to one of Japan’s other famous retreats, Karuizawa, offering secluded nature (including Lake Kinrin), small arts and craft shops, and local delicacies surrounded by gorgeous scenery.Winding down: Oita has some beautiful scenery in which to escape the everyday hustle and bustleFor an insight into the local culture, drop by the Stone Buddhas in Usuki, some of the oldest stone buddha statues in Japan that overlook a rural area of rice paddies and wildflower fields.Oita Stadium1351 Yokoo, Oita, Oita Prefecture 870-0126Capacity: 40,000Access:66 min by bus (South Liner) from Oita Airport to Park Place Oita, then 15-min walk or 5 min by taxi35-40 min by bus from Oita Station to Oita Sports Park, then 5-min walk Full steam ahead: Umi Jigoku, one of the famous ‘Hells of Beppu’ that punctuate the Oita landscapeOITAOita is Japan’s most famous prefecture for hot springs, with Beppu particularly well-known as having the largest number of hot spring sources in Japan.What makes Beppu so remarkable is the unique ‘Hells of Beppu’, seven hot spring locations across the city that no visitor will want to miss. These locations are primarily for viewing, rather than bathing, yet show Beppu’s onsen prowess in a fun and colourful light. Fixtures:New Zealand v Repêchage winner (Wed 2 Oct)Australia v Uruguay (Sat 5 Oct)Wales v Fiji (Wed 9 Oct)QF1 (Sat 19 Oct) & QF3 (Sun 20 Oct) Fixtures:Italy v Repêchage winner (Thu 26 Sept)France v USA (Wed 2 Oct)Ireland v Samoa (Sat 12 Oct) From hot springs and volcanoes to a unique food culture, Kyushu is a land of endless charms. Here’s why visitors to the 2019 World Cup should include it on their itinerary Defiant: Kumamoto Castle was built 400 years ago and survived the 2016 earthquakes largely intactKUMAMOTOKumamoto prefecture, where Wales will play Uruguay on 13 October, is home to many of Kyushu’s top sightseeing spots, including Kumamoto Castle – one of Japan’s three famous castles – and Mount Aso, an active volcano with one of the world’s largest calderas.Whilst the castle will take decades to fully restore following a 2016 earthquake, it is perfectly safe and a visit is highly recommended. The visitor centre there provides a fascinating insight into one of Japan’s best-loved castles, including a fantastic VR (virtual reality) presentation outlining the castle’s hidden defensive strengths.Scrumptious! An aka-ushi beef bowl with wasabi is one of many dishes you must try in KumamotoAs well as the chance to run into Kumamon – the prefecture’s beloved red-black character whose charming face adorns much of Kumamoto (and even Kyushu) – Kumamoto also offers delicious food. Dishes includes aka-ushi beef bowl with wasabi, Taipien (originally from China) and the local garlic-infused ramen.Food challengers may also be interested in the wasabi-beating Karashi-Renkon (spicy lotus root) and horse-meat sashimi – you might be surprised by how tasty it is!Kumamoto Egao Kenko Stadium2776 Hirayamamachi, Higashi Ward, Kumamoto, Kumamoto Prefecture 861-8012Capacity: 32,000Access:7 min by taxi from JR Hikarinomori Station (or 35-minute walk)50 min by bus from JR Kumamoto Station / Kumamoto Bus Terminal10 min by taxi from Aso Kumamoto Airport LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS In addition, there is a discount pass available which gives you unlimited access to the highway. For details, click here.Rental cars can also be booked online from the UK.last_img read more

first_img Going upstairs: referee Romain Poite signals for a review by the television match official (Getty Images) Six Nations Table 2021 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Who is leading the way in the Six… Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram 2021 Six Nations Referees TMO – television match official explainedWhat is a TMO in rugby?The acronym stands for television match official. The TMO is someone who watches the match action on TV screens, usually in a truck outside the ground. Using a system called Hawk-Eye, they can see multiple camera angles of an incident and pass on information to the match referee – via an earpiece – to help him make accurate decisions.Can the TMO intervene on any matter they like?No, the TMO in rugby is basically restricted to two crucial areas:1. The scoring of a try, whether the grounding of the ball or the build-up to the try. Any infringement within the two phases prior to a try would render it illegal.A referee can also use the TMO’s help to ascertain whether a kick went between the posts, but that’s quite a rare occurrence.2. Possible foul play. The TMO is free to communicate with the referee at any time if he sees something he suspects is foul play. Equally, the referee can ask the TMO to look at an incident, either while the game continues or after stopping play.Strong signal: referees can draw a box to signify to the crowd that a decision has gone to the TMO (Getty)Doesn’t it hold the game up?Yes. But efficient use of the TMO system has improved over the years. Referees have been encouraged to refer fewer decisions ‘upstairs’ in a bid to reduce the interruptions.Usually the footage is shown on a big screen inside the ground. If he likes, the referee can make a quick decision himself, without waiting to hear what the TMO has to say.World Rugby spell out in their laws that “the referee should not be subservient to the system” and that he is “the decision-maker and must remain in charge of the game”.Generally what happens is that the referee will relay “what I’m seeing” to the TMO, who will agree with him. The decision is made and the game resumes.But there are instances of TMOs trying to persuade a referee to change his mind. If they say “Would you like to look at it again?”, it suggests they think the ref has made the wrong call. And if they say “Those are all the angles”, it means they’re not sure so it’s over to you, ref! Hideaway: this is the sort of place you’ll find the TMO at work, well away from prying eyes! (Sky Sports)Can they watch the video footage as many times as they like?Strictly speaking yes, but this is entering murky waters. Some TMOs still seem unwilling to back their judgment until they’ve seen about ten replays! The key is that if a referee is seeking clarification that his initial decision can stand, the decision should only be reversed on TMO referral if the evidence is “clear and obvious”.Thus, for example, a possible forward pass shouldn’t lead to a try being disallowed if the direction of the pass is too borderline to call one way or the other. Just award it and play on. Six Nations Fixtures 2022 The 2022 Six Nations… Collapse Six Nations Table 2021center_img Six Nations Fixtures 2022 All-seeing: there are over 20 TV cameras at big games – but it still comes down to opinions (Sky Sports) Expand Expand 2021 Six Nations Referees Has the TMO made the game better?Most people think so. The system first appeared, in a very basic form, in 1999 and it’s taken a while to iron out the creases. The England-Fiji game that opened the 2015 World Cup rankled because 28% of the stoppage time was for TMO reviews.But the rationale behind it is to reduce or eradicate blatant injustices. Such as the try Wales’ Mike Phillips scored from a quick lineout against Ireland in 2011. Replays showed that the ball used by thrower Matthew Rees had been handed to him by a ballboy – which made a quick lineout illegal. But the try stood and Wales won 19-13.Another bone of contention is slow-motion replays, which invariably make an incident look worse than it actually was. Five years ago England’s James Haskell complained about this after being sin-binned for a high tackle against Ireland.Off you go! Romain Poite sends James Haskell to the sin-bin in 2016 following a high tackle (Getty)“Reviewing incidents is a good idea but playing it on the big screen, making it a big circus, is not constructive,” he said. “I think the referee, or the people who are making the judgment, should do it away from the big screen. I don’t know why it is made a spectacle.”Related content: Laughs aplenty in James Haskell’s new bookCertainly referees can be put under far more pressure to act by the aggressive reaction of a home crowd that watches an incident involving a visiting player on the big screen. The same offence by a home player might produce little more than a murmur!Don’t football have a TMO now?Yes, of sorts. They call their system VAR (Video Assistant Referee) and it’s already been branded a “shambles” by Alan Shearer.Football will find their use of it improves with time. But the cynical nature of top-level football – for example, attackers seeking contact in order to win a penalty – means disputes about decisions in the round-ball code will rage on and on! What exactly does a TMO do? Read our basic guide about the match official you never see but who plays a vital part in ensuring the on-field referee makes good decisions Who are the referees, touch judges and TMO’s… Six Nations Fixtures 2022last_img read more

first_img Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Same-Sex Marriage In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments (1) AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group [Ecumenical News International, Wellington, New Zealand] A bill to legalize marriage for same-sex couples on Aug. 29 passed the first of three readings in the New Zealand parliament by a margin of two to one, creating the likelihood of passage into law early next year.Faith groups stated their positions on the issue after the vote. New Zealand’s Roman Catholic bishops reaffirmed their opposition to redefining marriage.“To propose any alternative definition will have implications in law, and family structure which throughout history has been seen as the fundamental unit in every society,” Archbishop John Dew said.However, in Auckland, Anglican parish St. Matthews-in-the-City has erected a billboard, portraying the top of a wedding cake with two bride dolls kissing. It states, “We don’t care who’s on top.”Vicar Glynn Cardy said he considers commitment more important than gender, and welcomes removal of the barrier of sexual orientation from the requirement for a church wedding. “Such prejudice is contrary to the good news of Jesus Christ,” he said.But Anglican bishops say they do care “who’s on top.” “The billboard is a confusing message trading on cliches that I don’t think St. Matthew’s actually stands for,” Auckland Bishop Jim White said.Former Presbyterian minister David Clark, currently a Labour Party legislator, spoke in support of the bill. “I suspect [Jesus] would say that marriage is frequently paraded by those who claim a Christian viewpoint is really a thinly veiled defense of Victorian morality,” he told Parliament.However AFFIRM, a conservative Presbyterian group, dismissed supportive views of Presbyterians as “isolated voices,” saying same sex marriage was “spiritually offensive” to many Christian people.New Zealand already has in place same-sex civil union laws that confer many legal rights to gay couples. Same-sex marriage is currently recognized in the Netherlands, Argentina, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Portugal, South Africa, Spain, and Sweden. Several other countries, including France, Scotland and Australia, are considering making it legal. Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By David CramptonPosted Aug 30, 2012 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Comments are closed. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Hugh Magee says: Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Events New Zealand lawmakers back same-sex marriage Youth Minister Lorton, VA Human Sexuality, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Anglican Communion, Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI September 4, 2012 at 8:13 pm This is terrific news. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 last_img read more

first_img Christopher Ruhm says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams during a July 2011 conference at Lambeth Palace. Photo/Marcin Mazur from the archbishop’s official website[Church Times] The Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, has begun a campaign to persuade General Synod members to back the new women bishops legislation when it returns to debate it next month.The following article by Williams was published in the Church Times on Friday, Oct. 19.No-one is likely to underrate the significance of November’s debate on women bishops in General Synod. It will shape the character of the Church of England for generations – and I’m not talking only about the decision we shall take, but about the way in which we discuss it and deal with the outcome of it.Those who, like myself, long to see a positive vote will want this for a range of reasons which have to do with both the essential health of the Church and its credibility in our society. They are keenly aware of living with a degree of theological inconsistency.As Anglicans we believe that there is one priesthood and one only in the Church, and that is the priesthood of Jesus Christ – his eternal offering of himself, crucified, risen and ascended, to the Father to secure everlasting ‘covenanted’ peace between heaven and earth. To live as ‘very members incorporate in his Body’ on earth is to be alive with his Spirit and so to be taken up in his action of praise and self-offering so that we may reflect something of it in our lives and relationships. To recall the Church to its true character in this connection, God calls individuals to gather the community, animate its worship and preside at its sacramental acts, where we learn afresh who we are. The priestly calling of all who are in Christ is thus focused in particular lives lived in service to the community and its well-being, integrity and holiness – lives that express in visible and symbolic terms the calling of a ‘priestly people’.The commitment of most Anglicans to the ordained ministry of women rests on the conviction that what I have just summarised makes it inconsistent to exclude in principle any baptised person from the possibility of ordained ministry. And to take the further step of advocating the ordination or consecration of women as bishops is to recognise that the public role of embodying the priestly vocation of the Church can’t be subdivided into self-contained jobs, but is in some sense organically unified, in time and space. Ordained ministry is one connected reality, realised in diverse ways. The earliest Christian generations reserved the Latin and Greek words for ‘priest’ to refer to bishops, because they saw bishops as the human source and focus for this ministry of reminding the Church of what it is. The idea that there is a class of presbyters (or indeed deacons) who cannot be bishops is an odd one in this context, and one that is hard to rationalise exclusively on biblical or patristic grounds.If that is correct, a Church that ordains women as priests but not as bishops is stuck with a real anomaly, one which introduces an unclarity into what we are saying about baptism and about the absorption of the Church in the priestly self-giving of Jesus Christ. Wanting to move beyond this anomaly is not a sign of giving in to secular egalitarianism – though we must be honest and admit that without secular feminism we might never have seen the urgency of this or the inconsistency of our previous position.Rectifying the anomaly is, we believe, good news in a range of ways. It is good news for women, who are at last assured in more than words alone that their baptismal relationship with Jesus Christ is not different from or inferior to that of men as regards their fitness for public ministry exercised in Christ’s name and power. It is good news for men, who may now receive more freely the spiritual gifts God gives to women because women are recognised among those who can at every level animate and inspire the Church in their presidency at worship – and so it is good news for the whole Church, in the liberating of fresh gifts for all. It is good news for the world we live in, which needs the unequivocal affirmation of a dignity given equally to all by God in creation and redemption – and can now, we hope, see more clearly that the Church is not speaking a language completely remote from it own most generous and just instincts.But our challenge has been and still is to try and make it good news even for those within our fellowship who have conscientious doubts. The various attempts to find a formula to secure the conscientious position of those who are not convinced about the implications of the theology summarised earlier are not a matter of horse-trading, doing deals. They are a search for ways of expressing that mutual patience and gratitude that are just as much a part of life in the Body of Christ according to St Paul – trying to do the right thing for the Body, even if this leaves loose ends.And in this context, it is important to be clear about what the wording of the legislation does and doesn’t say. In a culture of instant comment, it’s all too easy for a version of what’s being said to gain ground and dominate the discussion even when it doesn’t represent what’s actually there. We saw this in the widespread but mistaken assumption that the amendment proposed by the bishops in May gave parishes the right to choose their own bishop. We are seeing it now in the equally mistaken assumption that the word ‘respect’ in the new amendment is little more than window-dressing.The truth is that the word does have legal content. If you’re required to show ‘respect’, you need to be able to demonstrate that what you do takes account in practice of someone’s conviction. You will need to show that it has made a difference to how you act; it doesn’t just recommend an attitude or state of mind (‘with all due respect…’). The word leaves enough flexibility for appropriate responses to different circumstances, but it isn’t so general as to be toothless.The legislation isn’t perfect; all legislation for complex communities embodies compromise and unfinished business. The tough question for those who are still undecided is whether delay would produce anything better. For those who think the legislation has compromised too far, it may be important to note that conscientious opposition has not grown noticeably weaker; it can’t be taken for granted that any delay would guarantee a smoother passage. And those who think that the provision for dissent is inadequate have to reckon with the extreme unlikelihood, given the way things have gone in the last few years, that any future legislation will be able to find a more acceptable framework. The chances are that there will in fact be greater pressure from some quarters for a ‘single clause’ measure.In other words, voting against the legislation risks committing us to a period of continued and perhaps intensified internal conflict with no clearly guaranteed outcome. Of course those who believe that the episcopal ministry of women is simply contrary to God’s will for the Church of England will vote against, and there should be no unfair pressure on clear consciences. They are voting for what they truly believe is God’s purpose for his Church.But for those who find it not quite good enough or not quite simple enough, the question must be, ‘What are you voting for if you vote against this Measure?’ And what if you decide that that the answer is, uncomfortably, a period of publicly embarrassing and internally draining indecision?My hope for next month’s debate is that it will tackle what is really before us, not what it is assumed or even suspected to mean; that it will give us grounds for trusting one another more rather than less; that it will be rooted in a serious theological engagement with what makes for the good of the Church and its mission, a serious attempt to be obedient to God’s leading – and, perhaps most soberingly, that it will not ignore the sense of urgency about resolving this that is felt inside and outside the Church, often with real pain and bewilderment. As a Synod, we are asked to act not only as a legislature but as a body that serves the Kingdom of God and takes a spiritual and pastoral responsibility for its actions. And I know that Synod members, myself among them, will be praying hard about what this entails.© Rowan Williams 2012 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Tags Women’s Ministry By Rowan WilliamsPosted Oct 19, 2012 DeAnna Bosch says: Rector Belleville, IL Rector Hopkinsville, KY October 23, 2012 at 9:56 am Scripture is very clear that women are not authorized to be priests or bishops or to have authority over men. The Church had been unwavering on the point for centuries. Women are not any less spiritual, less intelligent, less valuable but created differently than men. Many exceed men in ability- communication skills, theological understanding, human relations skills, fruit of the spirit, etc. They simply are prohibited from having authority over men as the Church is a reflection of the family and women are to be in subjection to their own husbands. All gender roles referred to in Scripture are not cultural mores but rooted in pre-Fall creation. To have women in authority over men breaks God’s divine order that He ordered. No congregation is a spiritually-healthy congregation that has a woman as pastor as it breaks God’s order at the fundamental difference from creation that He created them male and female. Comments (4) October 23, 2012 at 12:17 pm As I see it, the theological question is focused on the gender of Jesus. If Jesus’ priestly role is reserved for males, because he was male, how can his salvific acts be effective for women? In order for incarnation to take place, Jesus was restricted to one gender. But the universal church has attributed his salvific acts and incarnation to the language of ‘truly human, truly divine.’ It is Jesus’ humanity that is of utmost importance, not his gender. Therefore, all humanity made in God’s image, male and female, are redeemed. Jesus’ priesthood is also attached to his nature as fully human, fully divine–his gender is secondary.The attachment to male superiority expressed by Mr. Ruhm and defended by literalistic Biblical interpretation can only lead to the worst kinds of abuse and disenfranchisement of women. We need only look around the world to see what eventually happens (and historically has happened) to women when unyielding religious beliefs relegate them to second class humans.The gifts of ordained women at every level is evident to those of us who have experienced them and is well within the authority given to the Church by Jesus himself, “What you bind on earth will be bound in heaven, what you loose on earth will be loosed in heaven.” We are in the era of the great unbinding of those whom the Church has held in bondage these many centuries. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Karl Munford says: Submit a Job Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Women bishops: Enough waiting Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Comments are closed. Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Albany, NY Anglican Communion, Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK November 15, 2012 at 9:27 pm I think the question we need to ask ourselves is this:If there ever were, are they today and ‘Gender-Roles’ in the Church?http://esculent.co.uk/blog/articles/women_bishops/index.html Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Fr. Scott Turner says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Washington, DC October 19, 2012 at 4:23 pm “The priestly calling of all who are in Christ is thus focused in particular lives lived in service to the community and its well-being, integrity and holiness – lives that express in visible and symbolic terms the calling of a ‘priestly people’.”Now if Rowan and others would just admit that this applies to ALL people and not discriminate against anyone – regardless of race, gender or sexual orientation. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN last_img read more

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ By diocesan staffPosted Aug 19, 2013 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [Episcopal Diocese of Virginia press release] Church of the Holy Cross Korean will begin worshiping in the chapel at Truro Church in September,  a temporary move that will re-establish an Episcopal presence in Fairfax City.“This is an exciting time for the members of Holy Cross Korean as they look to the future,” said the Rt. Rev. Susan E. Goff, bishop suffragan, who oversees the diocese’s Dayspring initiative. “The chapel at Truro will offer the congregation the space and flexibility it needs for worship and fellowship.” The initial agreement for Holy Cross’ use of the Truro space extends through the middle of next year.The move to Truro will mark the end of Holy Cross Korean’s presence at St. Paul’s, Bailey’s Crossroads, in Falls Church, where the Korean congregation has been worshipping for 13 years.“St. Paul’s and Holy Cross have forged strong ties and built meaningful relationships in their years sharing the same worship space,” said Goff. “Now, it’s time for Holy Cross to move to a new space, and I know that the congregation will be energized by this opportunity.”Those sentiments were echoed by the Rev. Valentine Han, vicar of Holy Cross Korean. “Our arrangement with Truro means that we have our own offices and space, which is wonderful,” said Han. His congregation will join St. Paul’s in a combined service on Aug. 25 to give thanks for their partnership and to offer blessings for the Korean congregation as they embark on a new journey.Members of the Truro congregation left the Episcopal Church in 2006. The resulting property dispute was settled in April 2012.The terms of the settlement allow the Truro congregation to lease the property for a period agreed to by the diocese, currently through the middle of 2015, while reserving the right for the diocese to make use of the chapel on the Truro campus. “The congregation of Truro has been truly hospitable in accommodating the needs of Holy Cross,” said Goff. “We have engaged in several productive conversations with the rector and leadership team at Truro that give us great hope for an ongoing relationship built on respect and a shared love for Jesus Christ.”The first Sunday at Truro will be Sept. 1 for Holy Cross Korean, a mission congregation that was established in 1984. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC center_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit an Event Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virginia: Holy Cross Korean finds temporary home at Truro Church Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Events Submit a Press Releaselast_img read more

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Albany, NY Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Anglican Communion, Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Sudan & South Sudan Featured Events [Episcopal News Service] Hundreds of South Sudanese Episcopalians united in prayers for peace at a two-day gathering held last week in Kenya’s Rift Valley.The group, many of them refugees of the decades-long civil war in Sudan or more recently displaced by a politically fueled conflict in the south, was led in prayer and fasting by Sudanese bishops Nathaniel Garang Anyieth of Bor, Joseph Maker Atot of Pacong and Abraham Yel Nhial of Aweil.Garang urged South Sudanese “to pray for the nation and unite as one people,” adding that “it is only through prayer to God that the land can be healed,” according to the Christian Times. Yel challenged the prayer gathering not to accept political divisions and called on the international community and neighboring countries to continue praying and supporting South Sudan.Such prayer has been a central force in Sudan’s quest for peace.Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori was joined last month by heads of the North American Lutheran and Anglican churches in calling the church to prayer for South Sudan.“Prayer at the very least changes our own hearts,” Jefferts Schori said during an interview with ENS. “It joins us to people who are in the midst of radical suffering; it’s a reminder that we are all connected, that we are all children of the same God.”During the past five months, South Sudan has faced its greatest challenge since becoming the world’s newest nation in July 2011, when it seceded from the north in a referendum on independence following almost half a century of civil war.A separate conflict erupted last December after South Sudan President Salva Kiir accused his sacked former deputy Riek Machar of plotting a coup. Despite a May 9 peace deal between the two leaders, fighting has continued, but hope is resting on a fresh round of talks expected to begin soon in Kenya.Bishop Anthony Poggo of the Diocese of Kajo Keji, in Central Equatoria, told Episcopal News Service that despite a great deal of disappointment among South Sudanese concerning the recent violence, “we continue to walk together with those who are directly affected and we continue to share in prayer.”Poggo was speaking by telephone from the Church of England’s Diocese of Salisbury, which has been in partnership with the Episcopal Church of South Sudan and Sudan for more than 40 years.It was the first time Poggo had left South Sudan since the fighting began in December. He had been attending the Consultation of Anglican Bishops in Dialogue, a group of African and North American bishops who’ve committed to reconciliation in the Anglican Communion and to walking together as a family despite deep cultural and theological differences.“We as South Sudanese people have gone through much in the past and many of us pray a lot for God’s intervention and we continue to have the same hope we have always had,” said Poggo. “We strongly believe that this crisis will come to an end which is why we continue to be involved at various levels. Reconciliation is the key message of the church and we do that as part of our prayerful ministry to our people.”Poggo said he has faith that the anticipated peace talks in Kenya will be successful in bringing an end to the conflict because “the leaders have agreed that others need to be involved. It’s not only our politicians who are involved. It includes other stakeholders.”No region in South Sudan has escaped the impact of the recent conflict, which has left 1.5 million people displaced and 5 million in need of urgent humanitarian aid.Poggo’s Diocese of Kajo Keji has provided shelter to thousands of internally displaced people.“We have intervened, with the help of our partners, to offer support for emergency needs and basic medical needs and offering shelter,” he said.“We trust in God, we believe that God is the same God that we prayed to during the 50 years of civil war who answered our prayer. We have to put our trust in God. I believe that everything happens in accordance to his purpose.”Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, during a recent interview with Episcopal News Service, said, “As we pray, our hearts and minds are shaped by the wisdom and power of the spirit of God, and as we pray we engage with God in the struggle against human evil.“We must be battering at the gates of heaven in prayer” for South Sudan, he added. “Remorseless, unceasing prayer.”For further information about the crisis in South Sudan and resources for prayer, study and action, visit: www.episcopalchurch.org/sudan.— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing South Sudanese Episcopalians unceasing in prayers for peace New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector Collierville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Africa, By Matthew DaviesPosted Jun 2, 2014 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Washington, DClast_img read more