first_imgCompared to the winter period 2018-2019, offshore wind farms produced 60 per cent more electricity this winter, according to BOP, which added that winter production will further increase next year due to rapidly advancing technology and new wind farm installations. In February 2020, Belgian North Sea wind farms hit a record production of 804 GWh, measured at the Elia grid connection point. This corresponds to the annual consumption of 230,000 households, at 3,500kWh per year per household. This winter, offshore wind energy covered some 9 percent of the total electricity demand in Belgium, which represents a 50 per cent increase over the annual average in 2019. During the winter storms Ciara and Dennis, the majority of the wind turbines continued to produce electricity. On 29 February 2020, a production record was reached with 36 GWh of green electricity generated in the Belgian North Sea, BOP states. BOP The capacity factor reached an average of 56 per cent between November 2019 and April 2020, compared to 30 per cent in the non-winter months. In February 2020, it even reached 72 per cent. The average capacity factor in 2019 was 38.4 per cent. Six offshore wind farms in the Belgian sector of the North Sea produced an average of 639 gigawatt hours (GWh) of electricity per month from the beginning of November 2019 until the end of March 2020. This is 45 per cent more than the average for the rest of the year, according to Belgian Offshore Platform (BOP), a non-profit association of investors and owners of wind farms in the Belgian part of the North Sea.  last_img read more

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ After No. 27 Syracuse’s final home match this season, Sofya Golubovskaya walked off the court with tears in her eyes. She cried neither because it was Senior Day for her doubles partner nor because her first collegiate season was almost over.She cried because she had a bad match.In a day filled with emotions, SU’s only freshman was frustrated with herself after her match went unfinished at 4-6, 6-2, 1-4. She walked off the courts at Drumlins Country Club and declined to talk to the media.But almost instantly, her teammates were there to comfort her.“I’ve had a lot of struggles this year,” Golubovskaya said, “but now I have a team to help me, and I love it.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textGolubovskaya, a native of Moscow, came to Syracuse for the first time on Jan. 10. In more than three months, she has dealt with a multitude of adjustments. One of her biggest culture shocks was being a part of a team rather than playing as an individual, Golubovskaya said. It was new to her. A team, an aspect of tennis she once questioned, has driven her to improve her game as a regular at third singles for the Orange.For all of her life before arriving at SU, Golubovskaya competed alone in tournaments in Russia and Europe. Playing on a team was a concept she didn’t understand.“Tennis (is) not a team sport,” Golubovskaya said. “It was really new for me. I wasn’t ready at first.”A couple of weeks into Golubovskaya’s transition, junior Gabriela Knutson said the freshman was hesitant to bond with her new team. During team practices, SU works on cheering for teammates at matches, mostly during changeovers and in between points. That was something Golubovskaya had to get used to.“The first day here she didn’t cheer (with us) at all,” Knutson said. “It was like she didn’t understand what was going on.”One thing that helped her was that three of her seven teammates speak Russian. Anna Shkudun, Golubovskaya’s doubles partner, and Libi Mesh speak Russian, and Maria Tritou can hold a conversation in Russian from time to time, Golubovskaya said. Interactions with them helped Golubovskaya forget about the language barriers in her new life.To ease Golubovskaya’s adjustment, SU head coach Younes Limam wanted to mimic some of the tactics he used with then-freshman Miranda Ramirez last season. Limam set up biweekly meetings with Golubovskaya and associate head coach Shelley George.The meetings focused on her biggest challenges. Of the wide range of acclimations, Limam pointed toward understanding her coaches, teammates and professors as some of the toughest. At times, Golubovskaya sought advice during those encounters, while other times she asked for favors such as getting a ride to the mall, she said.Most of the season, Golubovskaya played third singles behind Knutson and Ramirez. During a pivotal three-match stretch against ranked teams, Golubovskaya won three-straight matches against then-No. 44 Clemson, then-No. 16 Wake Forest and then-No. 48 Louisville.This is the first season Golubovskaya has worried about playing teams and not just individuals. She used to only rely on herself to reach her goals. Now, Golubovskaya has seven other players on her side.“All my life I was just taking care of myself and nobody else,” Golubovskaya said, “Now that I’m here, I see that my teammates can help me in life.” Comments Published on April 30, 2018 at 10:58 pm Contact KJ: kjedelma@syr.edu | @KJEdelmanlast_img read more

first_img 200 players at the English Girls’ Championships have pledged to help grow the game of golf by introducing one friend to the sport.The aim of the campaign is for that friend to then pledge to introduce one of their friends to golf, creating a ripple effect across the country and in turn helping to boost participation levels of the sport.England Golf ambassador Charley Hull, who is currently playing at the RICOH Women’s British Open in Woburn, has backed the campaign. Charley said: “I have pledged to get one of my friends to take up golf so I can help grow the game and inspire the next generation to play. Golf is great to play with your friends – it’s a good way of spending some quality time together whilst doing exercise at the same time!”Lauren Spray, Women & Girls’ Participation Manager at England Golf said “It’s fantastic to see so many young girls pledging to help grow the game. This year is a really exciting year for golf with the sport being included in the Olympics for the first time in 112 years. With professional women such as Charley Hull and Scotland’s Catriona Matthew representing Team GB in Rio we are hoping that this will also help to inspire more women and girls all across the country to take up the game”.England Golf is working hard to tackle the challenges facing the game and create an even brighter future for golf. ‘Get into golf’ is a national campaign to get more people golfing. The campaign is designed to introduce new golfers, juniors and adults, to start playing as well as increasing the interest and participation in golf. Visit www.getintogolf.org to find out about beginner courses, taster lessons and special events at clubs and ranges nationwide.Other England Golf programmes to grow participation include Golf Express, which promotes 9-hole golf to encourage busy people to play all the game in half the time. It recognises the pace of modern life and offers 9-hole formats that most golfers can conveniently fit into a busy schedule. The golfexpress9.org website offers places to play across the country through its online directory and also features special offers.England Golf is also working to attract more women and girls to golf and has just held Women’s Golf Month to draw attention to the opportunities available. These include the successful Girls Golf Rocks programme, which is run jointly with the Golf Foundation. It encourages beginners to have fun, learn a new sport, get active and play alongside friends, with the encouragement of young ambassadors from county girls’ squads.The English girls’ championships for U18, U16 and U14 age groups are taking place at The Nottinghamshire Golf and Country Club. Click here for more information.Caption: Holly Haslam, Morgan Thomas, Briony Bayles, Chloe Gibbs and Bella Jay sign the pledge at the English girls’ championships. (Image © Leaderboard Photography) 28 Jul 2016 200 girls pledge to grow the game of golf last_img read more