first_imgThe National Elections Commission (NEC) yesterday launched the countdown to the holding of the 2017 legislative and presidential elections.The Commission also launched its new logo, website, Facebook and Twitter pages to effectively create awareness around the conduct of the 2017 elections.The Commission disclosed that it would conduct Liberia’s 3rd post war elections on October 10, 2017.NEC Acting Chairperson, Sarah Toe, said: “As of today, Sunday, May 29, the presidential and legislative election of October 10, 2017 is exactly 499 days away.”She indicated that the elections will be conducted in concert with Article 83 (a) of the Liberian Constitution, which states that voting for the President, members of the Senate and members of the House of Representatives shall be conducted throughout the Republic on the Second Tuesday in October of each election year.“Therefore, the Commission, in compliance with this Constitutional provision will conduct said elections on Tuesday, October 10, 2017. This date has been highlighted in the Timeline of the 2017 Elections,” she added.Madam Toe noted that as the NEC launched the countdown to the 2017 elections, the Commission wants to call on all members of the media to join it in building and creating awareness about the elections, which are very important to the current democratic history of Liberia.She disclosed that the new logo is a transparent ballot box with a red lid complemented with the letters ‘NEC’ written in bold blue capital letters. “The ballot box was the logo selected by a large percentage of stakeholders asked to select from a sample of logos during a consultation exercise organized by the NEC,” she told a news conference on Sunday.The new logo, Madam Toe disclosed, is part of a process in which the NEC is seeking to develop a more consistent corporate image to highlight its role as an independent Electoral Management Body (EMB).“The transparent ballot box represents transparency and an electoral process in which all voters can freely elect their leaders in a free, fair, credible and transparent manner. These terms are consistently being stressed by stakeholders as those associated with credible elections and electoral management bodies. The colors reflect the national colors and the blue, red and white mean Liberian nationhood and civic virtue,” she indicated.Madam Toe disclosed that NEC has reconstructed its website due to the advancement in technology and noted that the Commission’s new social media platforms (Facebook and Twitter) will present a whole new paradigm for effectively disseminating civic/voter education messages to the public as the country moves closer to the 2017 elections.She said in an era of greater transparency and authenticity, social media is rapidly delivering a new standard of interaction among people thus motivating the launch of the Commission’s Facebook and Twitter platforms.Madam Toe said she appreciates the media continuous partnership with the Commission and called on members of the press to effectively disseminate information about all aspects of the electoral process to the public, as the Commission strives to ensure the conduct of free, fair, transparent and credible elections in 2017.She commended all of NEC’s partners, particularly United States Agency for International Development (USAID) through the International Foundation for Electoral Systems (IFES), for the continuous support which resulted to the hiring of several consultants whose efforts had earned the Commission the success of the launch of the countdown, as well as the Facebook and Twitter pages.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

first_imgIt is one of those indelible images from the late 1960s that remains locked in the minds of those who were there. It’s a comedy album photograph of a nearly naked Richard Pryor, dressed in a loincloth, with bones through his nose and beads around his neck like a stereotypical African bushman from an old Tarzan movie. But there is a glare on the comedian’s face on 1968’s “Richard Pryor” album that seems to say, “I’m here and I’m going to change your thinking about race relations in every way possible.” That’s what Pryor, who died Saturday of a heart attack at age 65, did for people all across America in the 1970s, his breakthrough decade and a time when the country was hotly divided not only by the Vietnam War but by the civil rights battles of the 1950s and ’60s that preceded it. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREBlues bury Kings early with four first-period goals He did it by bringing black and white audiences together to laugh as one, at least for the length of a concert or a comedy album, at the madness all around them. “He was a brilliant and incredibly courageous performer,” recalled humorist Paul Krassner, whose magazine “The Realist” once published an essay by the comedian commenting on the disproportionate number of black soldiers that seemed to be fighting the Vietnam War. Pryor headlined it, “Uncle Sam Wants You, Nigger.” It was a word he would use frequently in the 1970s, even using it in the name of his second album as he tried to take the sting out of the epithet by repeating it over and over. After a visit to Africa in 1980, however, he would renounce it and say he no longer wanted to hear the word, either from his “hip white friends” or his fellow blacks. A subsequent recording was titled “That African-American is Still Crazy,” with the offending word crossed out. Such upfront, no-holds-barred, socially conscious commentary won Pryor the admiration of seemingly every black comic who followed him, an admiration perhaps best summed up by Keenen Ivory Wayans, who once said Pryor demonstrated “you can be black and have a black voice and be successful.” Pryor’s comedy also drew equally warm reactions from white comedians, including Bob Newhart, who on Saturday called Pryor “the single most seminal comedic influence in the last 50 years.” Although he was not the first comedian to liberally use the N-word or the F-word or any number of other once-unspoken-in-public words, Pryor seemed to use them to greater comedic effect than anyone else. When he was at his best he was not just funny, he was laugh-out-loud, falling-down, tears-in-your-eyes funny. Twisting and writhing his body into any number of contortions, Pryor would switch effortlessly from accent to accent as he told stories that made fun of every ethnicity and nationality he’d encountered. In one of the routines from his classic 1981 performance, “Live on the Sunset Strip,” the comedian recalled working for a Mafia-run nightclub that wasn’t paying him the money it had promised. Grabbing a gun and doing “my best black s–” he tried to rob the club owner, only to find that his performance, one that he recalled “usually scares” the average white person, provoked only laughter from an Italian-American mobster. “Do it again, Rich, put the gun up here,” he had the mobster telling him before going on to regale Pryor with stories of all the people he’d rubbed out. He could also do broader comedy, a talent that was displayed clearly in his best nonconcert films, “Silver Streak” and “Stir Crazy” with Gene Wilder. He even handled the occasional dramatic turn well, and he won an Emmy as a writer for one of Lily Tomlin‘s TV comedy specials. But stand-up, where he was left unbridled by censors, would become his legacy and win him five Grammy Awards for comedy album. Fellow comedian Steve Martin noted upon Pryor’s death: “By expressing his heart, anger and joy, Richard Pryor took comedy to its highest form.” – Associated Press 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more