first_img“While Biden will want to put other issues, including domestic concerns, at the top of his list of priorities, Pyongyang has a way of forcing the United States to pay attention to North Korea.”Waqas Adenwala, Asia analyst at The Economist Intelligence Unit, agreed.“North Korea often attempts to remain relevant by conducting various missile tests and this will ensure that the issue remains a key foreign policy priority,” he said.The reclusive regime launched missiles early in both the Obama and Trump administrations. Relations between Washington and Pyongyang have seen highs and lows over the past four years.President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un exchanged threats and provocations in 2017, but subsequently met twice at bilateral meetings in 2018 and 2019 discuss denuclearization in a bid to roll back tensions. The U.S. offered possible relief from sanctions that the U.N. has imposed on Pyongyang since 2006, but the talks failed to achieve much progress.Egyptian billionaire Naguib Sawiris, whose business holds a telecommunications license in North Korea, told CNBC’s Hadley Gamble that Biden should continue Trump’s policy to connect with Pyongyang.“I work in North Korea, and I know the mentality. The threats and the bullying and so on, it will not work with them,” he said. “What will work with them is, we reach (out) to them and we test their sincerity of peace.”“It’s not in our interest, as a free world, to have China dominate this part of the world and take North Korea to its side,” he added. Seoul should thus avoid the impression that its alliance policy is: ‘Please protect us while we make peace with Pyongyang and make money with Beijing.’Leif-Eric EasleyProfessor at Ewha University North Korea often attempts to remain relevant by conducting various missile tests and this will ensure that the issue remains a key foreign policy priority.Waqas Adenwala- Advertisement – “The coming weeks may see North Korea conduct a nuclear or long-range ballistic missile test in order to send a strong message to the incoming president,” said Evans Revere, a nonresident senior fellow at Brookings Institution. Revere also said the demands being made are widely viewed as “excessive, unfair and unsupported by facts,” and that Trump failed to recognize that the military presence in South Korea — meant to deter North Korea — will be beneficial for the U.S. as well.“I have no doubt that the Biden administration will recognize this and come to a speedy, reasonable agreement with our South Korean allies,” he said.Leif-Eric Easley, a professor at Ewha University in Seoul, said Biden would demand “more modest increases” in military cost-sharing without threatening to withdraw American troops.However, he said a Biden administration would be sensitive to international burden-sharing as it fights the pandemic at home. “Seoul should thus avoid the impression that its alliance policy is: ‘Please protect us while we make peace with Pyongyang and make money with Beijing,’” Easley said. – Advertisement – People watch a television news broadcast showing a file image of a North Korean missile test, at a railway station in Seoul on March 21, 2020.Jung Yeon-je | AFP | Getty Images Sharon Squassoni of George Washington University said Biden would take a principled approach to North Korea that supports “long-standing U.S. security and non-proliferation objectives.”The research professor at GWU’s Elliott School of International Affairs added that the North Korea would be a “top foreign policy objective for Biden from the start,” even if Kim doesn’t provoke the U.S. with more missile tests.She said Biden knows “benign neglect” won’t work with North Korea, and will seek to address it.“It may be quieter diplomatically than anything Trump ever did, but I think it will be a priority,” said Squassoni.South Korea and JapanExperts also weighed in on what a Biden presidency would mean for other North Asian countries. Leaders from Japan and South Korea have congratulated Biden, and said they want to work on their alliances with the U.S.Under Trump, the U.S. considered reducing its military presence in South Korea and signaled it wanted South Korea to pay more for troops stationed in the country after a cost-sharing agreement expired in 2019.“It is natural for any U.S. administration to urge Seoul to pay more to underwrite the costs of stationing U.S. forces in Korea,” said Revere, noting that South Korea has already agreed to boost its contributions. “However, the Trump administration has rejected this generous increase and demanded more.”center_img SINGAPORE — North Korea may launch missiles to send a “strong message” to President-elect Joe Biden and ensure Pyongyang continues to be a foreign policy priority in Washington, analysts told CNBC.NBC News on Saturday projected that Biden would win the U.S. presidential election, four days after Election Day. President Donald Trump has not conceded, and has filed multiple lawsuits in swing states amid unsubstantiated claims of voter fraud and illegal votes.Experts said Biden’s priority will be to tackle the coronavirus crisis and worries about the U.S. economy, but that North Korea could test weapons to make its presence felt.- Advertisement – President-elect Joe Biden waves to supporters as he leaves the Queen theater after receiving a briefing from the transition Covid-19 advisory board on November 09, 2020 in Wilmington, Delaware.Joe Raedle | Getty Images News | Getty Images The Economist Intelligence Unit Japanese flag in Tokyo ahead of U.S. President Donald Trump’s visit to Japan in November 2017.Artur Widak | NurPhoto | Getty Images In Japan, relations are likely to strengthen further, according to Adenwala of the EIU.That’s because Biden will not pursue a “volatile and mercantilist policy” with its allies, he said.Biden and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga do not have the same personal rapport that Trump and former Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shared, but they will likely work together on the basis of “mutual interests such as trade and especially on issues of security, particularly in the face of increasingly assertive policies from China,” Adenwala said.Brookings’ Revere said there has been “considerable unease” in Japan over Trump’s approach to North Korea. He added that Biden would manage North Korea and burden-sharing negotiations well, and “restore confidence in the United States’ handling of bilateral defense and security ties.” – Advertisement –last_img read more

first_imgBRIDGETOWN, Barbados (CMC) – Axed Trinidad and Tobago Red Force wicketkeeper/batsman Denesh Ramdin has blasted the team’s selectors and has gone as far as accusing coach Mervyn Dillon of not wanting him around.In an interview on the Mason & Guest radio show here Tuesday, the former West Indies captain said the disrespect of senior players by the selectors and the uncertainty team members were feeling were affecting morale.The veteran cricketer, who chairman of selectors Tony Gray said had been omitted from the 13-man squad for the sixth and seventh rounds of the tournament because of a lack of form, added that there was a serious problem in communication between players and management.“They’re not respecting our senior players. They are doing their own thing, basically,” the former Red Force skipper said, adding that he was not the only experienced player who has been overlooked.“Ravi Rampaul was available for the whole season and they just bypassed him. When you look around there’s no one who can bowl faster than this guy. He helps the younger players.”In the two matches he played for Red Force this season, Ramdin batted three times and scored just 16 in one instance and two ducks in the others. He ended last season with 348 runs, including two half-centuries, at an average of almost 22.Ramdin admitted being “shocked and surprised” at being dropped, adding that the chairman of selectors had told him to “play club cricket”.“Our system is very strange. They will call you and let you know when you get dropped, but when you get selected you have to read it in the news. It’s very disrespectful,” he told radio show hosts Andrew Mason and Dr Andrew Forde.“I’m not sure what message they’re sending to the younger players because at the moment they have players who think that if you get a low score you’re going to be out the next game, so guys are not comfortable in the game. They’re scratching here, they’re scratching there, they’re wondering ‘if I don’t make runs this game, I’m gone the next game’.”Ramdin said he would have loved to captain the team for one more season, to give the younger players guidance, but believed he was not appreciated or wanted by Dillon, with whom he said he did not “see eye-to-eye”.“That’s what we’re lacking in the Caribbean at this point in time – the guidance of the younger players to do certain things, but our coach at the moment, I don’t think he wants me around,” he charged.“I believe he just wants a young group of guys that he can dictate and use them to go forward, but this Four-Day Tournament you need senior players around so that when pressure comes you’d be able to handle it a lot better.”Red Force are going into the next round of the six-team tournament in fifth place, on 46.6 points. Barbados Pride lead the standings with 84.2 points, ahead of defending champions Guyana Jaguars on 60.8 points. They are followed by Jamaica Scorpions on 57.4 points and Windward Islands Volcanoes on 50 points. Leeward Islands Hurricanes round up the bottom with 32.6 points.In addition to Ramdin, four others were dropped from the Red Force squad, led by Yannick Ottley. Ramdin, Yannic Cariah, Keagan Simmons, Kissoondath Magram and Daniel St Clair have been replaced by fast bowler Anderson Phillip, veteran leg-spinner Imran Khan, spinner Khary Pierre, batsman Isaiah Rajah, and former West Indies Under-19 batsman Cephas Cooper. RED FORCE SQUAD: Yannick Ottley (captain), Jeremy Solozano, Isaiah Rajah, Joshua Da Silva, Jason Mohammed, Imran Khan, Akeal Hosein, Bryan Charles, Uthman Muhammad, Anderson Phillip, Terrance Hinds, Cephas Cooper, Khary Pierre. Mervyn Dillon (coach), David Furlonge (manager).last_img read more