first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ After No. 27 Syracuse’s final home match this season, Sofya Golubovskaya walked off the court with tears in her eyes. She cried neither because it was Senior Day for her doubles partner nor because her first collegiate season was almost over.She cried because she had a bad match.In a day filled with emotions, SU’s only freshman was frustrated with herself after her match went unfinished at 4-6, 6-2, 1-4. She walked off the courts at Drumlins Country Club and declined to talk to the media.But almost instantly, her teammates were there to comfort her.“I’ve had a lot of struggles this year,” Golubovskaya said, “but now I have a team to help me, and I love it.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textGolubovskaya, a native of Moscow, came to Syracuse for the first time on Jan. 10. In more than three months, she has dealt with a multitude of adjustments. One of her biggest culture shocks was being a part of a team rather than playing as an individual, Golubovskaya said. It was new to her. A team, an aspect of tennis she once questioned, has driven her to improve her game as a regular at third singles for the Orange.For all of her life before arriving at SU, Golubovskaya competed alone in tournaments in Russia and Europe. Playing on a team was a concept she didn’t understand.“Tennis (is) not a team sport,” Golubovskaya said. “It was really new for me. I wasn’t ready at first.”A couple of weeks into Golubovskaya’s transition, junior Gabriela Knutson said the freshman was hesitant to bond with her new team. During team practices, SU works on cheering for teammates at matches, mostly during changeovers and in between points. That was something Golubovskaya had to get used to.“The first day here she didn’t cheer (with us) at all,” Knutson said. “It was like she didn’t understand what was going on.”One thing that helped her was that three of her seven teammates speak Russian. Anna Shkudun, Golubovskaya’s doubles partner, and Libi Mesh speak Russian, and Maria Tritou can hold a conversation in Russian from time to time, Golubovskaya said. Interactions with them helped Golubovskaya forget about the language barriers in her new life.To ease Golubovskaya’s adjustment, SU head coach Younes Limam wanted to mimic some of the tactics he used with then-freshman Miranda Ramirez last season. Limam set up biweekly meetings with Golubovskaya and associate head coach Shelley George.The meetings focused on her biggest challenges. Of the wide range of acclimations, Limam pointed toward understanding her coaches, teammates and professors as some of the toughest. At times, Golubovskaya sought advice during those encounters, while other times she asked for favors such as getting a ride to the mall, she said.Most of the season, Golubovskaya played third singles behind Knutson and Ramirez. During a pivotal three-match stretch against ranked teams, Golubovskaya won three-straight matches against then-No. 44 Clemson, then-No. 16 Wake Forest and then-No. 48 Louisville.This is the first season Golubovskaya has worried about playing teams and not just individuals. She used to only rely on herself to reach her goals. Now, Golubovskaya has seven other players on her side.“All my life I was just taking care of myself and nobody else,” Golubovskaya said, “Now that I’m here, I see that my teammates can help me in life.” Comments Published on April 30, 2018 at 10:58 pm Contact KJ: kjedelma@syr.edu | @KJEdelmanlast_img read more

first_imgA family in Missouri is reporting that they were made aware that the house they purchased was once used as a meth lab after their unborn child tested positive for methamphetamines.According to the report, the couple, Tyler and Elisha Hessel, went to the doctor for normal prenatal check-up when the doctor informed them of the find in Elisha’s blood work. Elisha says she had not been taking any methamphetamines which began an investigation of how the drug got into her system. Eventually the couple had their house tested for the drug and found a positive match for extreme levels of the substance within its foundation.When the couple inquired further about their home, they were informed that their house was once used as a meth lab.The Hessel’s have since moved out of their house for their safety and the safety of their unborn child, and say that when they contacted their bank, the county, and insurance company, none of the agencies could give them a clear answer as to why the house was sold to them without that information being disclosed originally.In addition to that, the couple says in order to get the house back to a livable state, they would have to strip the house down and rebuild it but their insurance company will not pay the $100,000 they were quoted from the rebuild. The couple says they have since resorted to creating a Gofundme page to help them get their lives back.If you would like to donate to this family click here.last_img read more

first_imgBy John BurtonWALL – For the veterans who are working to restore a Vietnam–era combat helicopter, the experience is bringing back strong emotions and memories.Carl Burns, veteran helicopter pilot and volunteer on the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial Foundation’s Huey project, holds the tail section cover, signed by all the volunteers, that will be part of the Huey when it is installed next May at thefoundation’s Vietnam Era Museum and Educational Center in Holmdel.“You’re talking about a pretty intense part of my life,” said Ken Gurbisz, a former U.S. Army warrant officer who flew a similar helicopter in-country more than 40 years ago.Gurbisz was on hand Monday in a hangar with about 15 other veterans at Mon­mouth Executive Airport, Highway 34.The veterans, mostly from the Vietnam War – two served in Afghanistan – are working to restore a 1964 Bell UH-1D Iroquois helicopter, which is usually referred to as a “Huey.”They have been working since winter to put back into reasonable shape the helicopter that for them – and probably countless others – holds emotional significance.The type of helicopter is “not only a physical symbol of the Vietnam War,” said volunteer Carl Burns, but it is also “an emotional symbol.“The sights and the smells” of the craft have brought back all sorts of thoughts and feelings for those working on it, acknowledged Burns, a Manalapan resident who flew one as an Army captain in 1966-67.The volunteers “all had tears in our eyes,” when they first saw it, even though it was nothing but a hollowed shell at the time, Gurbisz said.A large group of Army veterans are volunteering their time to restore a deactivated Hueyhelicopter that served two tours in Vietnam. Sarah Hagarty (front) is the program director for the memorial foundation.In January, the New Jersey National Guard offered the helicopter to the New Jersey Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial Foundation for its permanent display at the foundation’s Vietnam Era Museum and Educational Center, located on the grounds of PNC Arts Center, Holmdel.The craft, which served two tours of duty in Vietnam, first from October 1966 through September 1967 when it was assigned to the 116th Assault Helicopter Company and then from November 1968 to February 1970 with the 25th Infantry Division. While with the 25th, it was located at Cu Chi, which was 30 miles northwest of Saigon, said Burns, who also served in that area with the 25th during his tour.The helicopter was seriously deteriorated.“You have to remember it sat in a field for 20 years,” at Fort Dix, Gurbisz said. “We had many bird’s nests and hornet’s nests to get rid of.”The volunteers all have connections to this style of aircraft. That “has been great, because they know how to work on them or know how to fly them,” said Sarah Hagarty, program director for the memorial foundation.So far the group, which meets every week at the airport hangar to work on the project, has spent a collective 1,500 hours to restore it, Hagarty said.Volunteers restoring a 1964 Bell UH-1D Iroquois helicopter, commonly known as a Huey, clean it in a hangar at Monmouth Executive Airport.The project began with removing the Desert Storm-era tan camouflage, to restore it to its original olive drab exterior. “That was a lot of sanding,” Gurbisz said. After­ward, the work has been cleaning and refurbishing to make the interior presentable for what will be an authentic, fixed display for visitors, especially for the school-age children, who visit the memorial and museum.The group has been collecting spare parts from wherever it can get them, Hagarty and Gurbisz said.It looks as though there will be enough parts to sufficiently restore the craft’s cockpit to allow visitors to sit in it. The volunteers hope to be able to raise enough money to restore it and have it ready for an unveiling on May 7, 2014, which is the state Vietnam Veterans Remembrance Day. The group also hopes to also be able to afford to install a simulator in the cockpit to give visitors a realistic appreciation of what it was like to fly in such an aircraft.“It’s a pretty tall order,” Hagarty said about the work that needs to be done.While the project has received some support with organizations and individuals contributing funds and parts, the overall project will cost between $150,000-$200,000, according to Hagarty.This week the museum is beginning its KickStarter campaign to assist in fundraising efforts for the project’s completion.For these guys – the group of volunteers is all male – this is an important project in terms of the nation’s history and their own.“When I first saw this, it was a ton of flashbacks,” Gurbisz said. “I was one of those 20-year-old warrant officers” assigned to Vietnam’s Central Highlands region, flying Hueys on rescue and recovery missions.Burns, who authored the memoir Centaurs in Vietnam: Untold Stories of the First Year, remembered how he was flying a Huey during his tour of Vietnam when he, his crew and the craft started taking on enemy fire.“They were in their spider holes firing – ping, ping, ping,” went the shots as it hit the helicopter shell, Burns said, noting his crew was operating the helicopter’s machine guns, strafing the area. Enemy fire then caught the tail rudder and the craft began twisting, eventually crashing in a rice paddy. Thankfully, he and the four-member crew all survived, he said.There were about 3,000 of these helicopters at any given time operating in Vietnam, playing a vital role in that conflict, Gurbisz said. There were a total of roughly 14,000 in use over the course of the war of which about 6,000 didn’t make it out, Burns said.“I left one there,” he said.Young visitors to the museum will “get a sense of the war,” and its significance from the site’s multimedia presentations and existing displays. “But, they don’t really understand the role of the helicopter, the magnitude of it,” Gurbisz. “It brought guys in. It carried them out. It brought supplies” and transported the wounded during its active combat role, Burns said. “It brought them beer,” he said with a slight smile.“It was part of you,” for that time in their lives, Burns said.For more information about the project, visit www.njvvmf.org.last_img read more

first_imgMichael Machowsky3786422%49%$297,106 Vladimir Cerin4696620%46%$341,424 (Current Through Saturday, March 26) SANTA ANITA STATISTICS Martin Garcia12418131315%35%$1,046,229 Santiago Gonzalez26947343317%42%$1,898,601 Kent Desormeaux12419252215%53%$1,596,495 TrainerSts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won Flavien Prat24440454016%51%$2,594,116 Agapito Delgadillo961311914%34%$374,777 David Lopez16624142114%36%$743,416 -30- Carla Gaines5386315%32%$647,700 Steven Miyadi6813131019%53%$398,147 Joseph Talamo23429262612%35%$1,974,869 Alonso Quinonez866967%24%$306,730 Drayden Van Dyke16316162610%36%$1,001,672 William Spawr41106424%49%$279,732 Edwin Maldonado18039171822%41%$1,227,090 Rafael Bejarano27865552923%54%$3,050,147 J. Keith Desormeaux48861017%50%$351,629 Victor Espinoza871110813%33%$848,350 Mario Gutierrez17420312311%43%$1,246,549 Peter Eurton9215221216%53%$1,055,532 Tiago Pereira10861186%23%$437,783 Mike Smith951191712%39%$1,642,810center_img Brice Blanc5966810%34%$524,950 Brayan Pena7045126%30%$164,690 Stewart Elliott3843311%26%$177,915 TOKYO CITY CUP DISTANCE SUITS CHINA DOLL LOVERChina Doll Lover tackles a mile and a half for the first time when he runs in next Sunday’s Grade III, $100,000 Tokyo City Cup for older horses. He has a lot of company.The distance is rarely run in the United States, especially on dirt, but trainer Dan Hendricks feels it will be right in the wheel house for the six-year-old gelded son of Lawyer Ron. “His works have been great. It seems a mile and a half will be better for him,” Hendricks said.FINISH LINES: Turf marathon specialist Big John B, seventh in the grassy San Luis Rey Stakes March 13 after a wide trip, worked six furlongs Sunday in 1:14.20. Trainer Phil D’Amato has the seven-year-old Hard Spun gelding nominated to next Sunday’s Tokyo City Cup at a mile and a half on dirt . . . Early probables for next Saturday’s Grade III San Simeon Stakes for older horses at about six and a half furlongs on turf are Guns Loaded, Rafael Bejarano; No Silent, Gary Stevens; and Producer, Drayden Van Dyke . . .Santa Anita morning line maker Jon White relates that California Chrome spotted runner-up Mubtaahij “about nine lengths” in winning yesterday’s Dubai World Cup . . . Santa Anita will host Christine A. Moore for a Trunk Show on Saturday, April 9, at Champions Gift Shop where her Spring 2016 Collection will be showcased. Fans are invited to see a great selection of women’s and men’s styles. Tyler Baze26025403810%40%$1,393,751 Jerry Hollendorfer13522141516%38%$1,642,826 Doug O’Neill18129272616%45%$1,470,358 Bob Baffert9921161721%55%$1,570,285 Richard Baltas11219191417%46%$1,242,329 Mike Puype79812510%32%$369,930 Peter Miller12614122011%37%$629,960 ESPINOZA TOURS DUBAI AFTER SPARKLING CHROME ROMPDESORMEAUX SEEKS BETTER FINISH IN SANTA ANITA DERBYHENDRICKS LIKES MARATHON DISTANCE OF TOKYO CITY CUPSANTA ANITA WELCOMES ESPINOZA ON THURSDAYVictor Espinoza had more reason than usual to smile yesterday after guiding California Chrome to an eventful yet facile victory in the $10 million Dubai World Cup, worth $6 million to the winner and making the five-year-old California-bred son of Lucky Pulpit North America’s all-time leading earner with $12,532,650.“I spoke to Victor about midnight our time last night,” said his agent, Brian Beach, Sunday morning. “He’s staying in Dubai for a couple days because he’s never had a chance to see the sights, but he’ll be back at Santa Anita in time to ride on Thursday.”Espinoza is named on Lynne’s Legacy for trainer Jim Cassidy in the second race and El Huerfano in the fourth for trainer Peter Miller.Espinoza, who turns 44 on May 23, two weeks after the Kentucky Derby on May 7, won the World Cup despite a wide trip and having the saddle slip, never losing his cool and winning on cruise control by 3 3/4 lengths.“It was an impressive win,” Beach said, “but I was talking with Alan (Sherman, son of and assistant to California Chrome’s trainer, Art Sherman) every once in a while since he’s been over there, and he kept telling me, ‘This horse is doing better than at any point they’ve ever had him, better than his three-year-old year (2014).’ They were expecting a big effort.”“Chrome,” who made his 5-year-old debut in the Grade II San Pasqual Stakes here on Jan. 9, winning by 1 ¼ lengths, will be flown from Dubai to Chicago, where he’ll then be vanned to Kentucky.The long-range agenda for California Chrome’s future races would likely culminate with the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic at Santa Anita on Nov. 5, but first things first.“They want to get him back to Taylor Made (Farm in Kentucky) and spend some time there before making plans,” Beach said. Taylor Made and Perry Martin own California Chrome.Meanwhile, Espinoza, the transnational tourist, is laughing all the way to the bank, although the self-proclaimed “happy Mexican” doesn’t need a vault of dinero to appease him.Espinoza’s cut of the $6 million winner’s share is $600,000.“Victor has a smile on his face 24-7,” Beach said.Any wonder? John Sadler831310816%37%$828,594 George Papaprodromou5295617%38%$292,010 Kristin Mulhall50117322%42%$402,645 Ron Ellis3292328%44%$229,050 Mark Glatt971012910%32%$496,460 Abel Lezcano757459%21%$526,844 Gary Stevens6312111019%52%$1,589,898 Philip D’Amato13327212320%53%$1,468,565 Martin Pedroza1001310713%30%$359,495 Fernando Perez17417202310%34%$909,362 JockeyMts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won TRAINER WANTS BIG FINISH FROM EXAGGERATORThe jury is still out on Exaggerator for the $1 million, mile and an eighth Santa Anita Derby on April 9, at least in the mind of trainer Keith Desormeaux.The trainer has little doubt about the colt’s ability, but the question lingers on why he didn’t finish after making a bold move on the far turn in the San Felipe Stakes at 1 1/16 miles March 12. The son of Curlin was beaten 2 ¾ lengths despite trouble in the race.“I don’t have any complaints about how the San Felipe set up,” Desormeaux said about Exaggerator’s third-place finish behind front-running Danzing Candy and closer Mor Spirit. “He ran a decent middle quarter to make up the distance that he was from off the pace, and he should be able to do that.“The horse is very talented, yet I still can’t explain why he didn’t finish better. Even if there’s more speed in the Santa Anita Derby, it doesn’t matter to me. The way my horse ran last time, I hope he does the same thing, except for the finish.“I can’t explain why he didn’t finish.”Probable for the Grade I Santa Anita Derby: Danzing Candy, Mike Smith; Mor Spirit, Gary Stevens; Exaggerator, Kent Desormeaux; Uncle Lino, Fernando Perez; Smokey Image, Victor Espinoza; Iron Rob, Stewart Elliott; and Denman’s Call, Rafael Bejarano.last_img read more